All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson Download (read online) free eBook .pdf.epub.kindle

All the Flowers in Shanghai

All the Flowers in Shanghai is Jepson’s stunning debut novel. Set in 1930s Shanghai,the Paris of the East, but where following the path of duty still takes precedence over personal desires, a young Chinese woman named Feng finds herself in an arranged marriage to a wealthy businessman. In the enclosed world of her new household-a place of public ceremony and private cruelt

…more


The Book in English!


Download All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson free eBook pdf mobi epub mp3 fb2 CD txt doc kindle Ibook iOS:


All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson (0.00 USD)


Download All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson eBook Free:

MIRROR-2

All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson.pdf (USD-0.00)
All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson.epub (USD-0.00)
All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson.doc (USD-0.00)
All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson.txt (USD-0.00)
All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson.mobi (USD-0.00)


Join hundreds of thousands of satisfied members who previously spent countless hours searching for media and content online, now enjoying the hottestnew games, music, books, movies & software on our site.
It’s here and it’s free. Here’s why you should join:


  • Unlimited books, magazines and comics, wherever you go: directly in your browser on your computer or tablet.
  • More than 10 million titles spanning every genre imaginable, at your fingertips.
  • Get the best books, magazines and comics in all genres, including action, adventure, anime, manga, children and family, classic, , Horror, Music, Romance, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Sport and more.
  • New titles are added every day! We want to keep things new.
  • All platforms. Fully optimized
  • Find out why thousands of people go every day.Sign up and enjoy your entertainment, unlimited!


    TAGS:
    Online All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson eBook, Book All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson FB2, download All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson PDF , Download All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson MOBI, Online All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson eBook, free download All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson IPhone, Online ebook All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson PDF, Free All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson DJVU, Free download All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson TXT, Download All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson RTF, Online All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson FB2 , eBook All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson download TXT, Free All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson download eBook, Book All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson download MOBI, download All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson IPad, read All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson MOBI, Read online All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson DOC, Free All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson AWZ, Download eBook All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson iPad , Free All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson DJVU, Download All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson eBook free, Free download All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson DVD, Read online All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson TXT, Book All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson download DJVU, All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson download book free, All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson download book pdf free, All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson pdf book download free, Download eBook All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson pdf free, All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson download free epup, All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson ePub book download free, download eBook All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson, All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson download free pdf, All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson download eBooks free.

    Aditi

    As quoted by the Chinese Communist revolutionary leader and the founding father of the People’s Republic of China, Mao Tse Tung, commonly called Chairman Mao,

    “In class society, everyone lives as a member of a particular class, and every kind of thinking, without exception, is stamped with the brand of a class.”

    Well no wonder why the middle-class Chinese families in the 1930s were so keen on becoming the ‘face’ of the society or, rather say a class society, thus leading to animosity between the p

    “In class society, everyone lives as a member of a particular class, and every kind of thinking, without exception, is stamped with the brand of a class.”

    Well no wonder why the middle-class Chinese families in the 1930s were so keen on becoming the ‘face’ of the society or, rather say a class society, thus leading to animosity between the poor and rich and the rich used to treat the poor like the untouchables. The rich used to get scared whether if their children befriend someone so poor, that they might lose their ‘face’ in the society. It’s so astounding to see that this type of narrow-mindedness existed in those people and thus giving birth to seed of the Chinese revolution. Not only that, it was shameful to give birth to daughters in the rich family and how they were given away to the poor farmers.

    Well it was so fascinating to gather these kinds of knowledge and especially more captivating and alluring to read about a young girl’s life journey during those hard times. A very notable author-cum-award-winning-director/producer-of-5-feature-films-cum-editor-cum-lawyer, Duncan Jepson has remarkably got into the skin of a young Chinese girl living in Shanghai, in his novel, All the Flowers in Shanghai, to narrate her journey from the beautiful gardens to the lavish cage of marriage to the dreadful village outside Shanghai. After reading this book, I learnt that by writing this novel, Duncan has certainly paid tribute to his loving mother as well as to his homeland and the people of his homeland. And as said by the American leader/politician/author, James E. Faust,

    “There is no greater good in all the world than motherhood. The influence of a mother in the lives of her children is beyond calculation.”

    And Duncan Jepson has justified these striking words in his novel so brilliantly. Motherhood is not some responsibility but it is a gift of life beyond any material or earthly possessions and how Feng, Duncan’s novel’s primary character realizes this and dons the hat of a mother so beautifully.

    A 17year old girl named Xiao Feng, living under the wings of his grandfather, who is her only friend in her family. Since her parents were too focused on their elder daughter, so Feng used to get away with her grandfather into the beautiful gardens where they both used to tend to the beautiful flowers. But her sister’s sudden death changes the course of Feng’s life and simultaneously killing away all her dreams. She gets trapped into her marriage, soon becoming a mother for the first time, but since it was a shame to give birth to daughters, so Feng gives her daughter away to some poor farmers, and when she realizes her loss over her daughter, it was too late. Thus her life turns more painful and unbearable each passing day. Will she ever find her? Will she ever prove herself as a mother? Will she ever find a way to freedom from her cage? Read this book, to find it out and watch you getting bewildered by this exotic and forbidden tale.

    It’s so spectacular to see that a man can easily get into the skin of a vulnerable young woman and penning down her journey as well as bringing out the right emotions into her. Even after reading the whole book, I was still stupefied by the fact that how he described each and every emotion of Feng so accurately and how he traced her journey from a young virgin girl to a scared wife to a rich family to being a mother.

    Well the characters are very extraordinary and remarkable. Feng, the protagonist, who was first portrayed as an immature (way too immature) young teenage girl, who love tending flowers in her garden and used to compare people and their characteristics with flowers, then becoming the wife to a rich family and finally becoming a mother and then failing at it. All through her journey, we find Feng as being immature vulnerable to scared to confident to determined and finally brave woman and also it was too surprising to see how after suffering from too much pain and torture, in the and she stands as a one true brave and confident lady.
    Bi, a young lad who is a fisherman’s son, and since his mother was a seamstress to Feng’s sister, he used to visit the garden to catch fish. Eventually, Bi and Feng become more than just friends and being naive, they never understood their feelings toward each other. But their chemistry was quite inevitable and undeniable and very innocent.
    Xiong Fa was the man Feng was married to, a very coward man, and living under the wings of his mother, who was the First wife to his father. But he was quite caring and loving and never intended to harm Feng. It was Feng who never understood his intentions and feelings. And in the end, Xiong Fa proves to be a good father.
    Meng Lu, younger son of Feng, was quite intelligent and smart like his mother but he was born with a deformed leg, hence making him a victim of torments from his cousins. But it was amazing to see just like his mother, he too used to see good in people.
    Sang Yu was Feng’s daughter, whom she traded way with the poor peasants. Although Feng remain guilty all through her life because of her act, but she had a reason behind it. And I was amazed to see even after getting beaten up, thrown away from her, Yu forgives her mother in the end.

    Finally Duncan’s writing is something, so lyrical, so poetic and so beautiful that it mesmerizes you completely. You become hooked to the novel till its very end. You laugh, cry and smile along with Feng’s journey. According to me the whole story was very painfully beautiful.

    If you want to know about the Chinese customs, narrow-mindedness towards daughters and arranged marriages and how one revolution changed the course o Chinese history, then this book is a must read!

    Duncan Jepson, I cannot thank you enough for giving me this honorable opportunity to read your novel.

    P.S. Find yourself falling in love with the novel’s cover and the beautiful texture of the pages!
    …more

    Bkwmlee

    3.5 stars

    As I was looking for a book to fill the “J” entry for my A to Z Challenge, I came across Duncan Jepson’s debut novel All the Flowers in Shanghai and in reading the summary, I decided to add this one to my list for this challenge. Perhaps it is due to my Chinese background and growing up surrounded by family stories about my culture and its rich history, but over the years, I’ve developed a certain fondness for historical fiction set in China and since this book fell into that category

    As I was looking for a book to fill the “J” entry for my A to Z Challenge, I came across Duncan Jepson’s debut novel All the Flowers in Shanghai and in reading the summary, I decided to add this one to my list for this challenge. Perhaps it is due to my Chinese background and growing up surrounded by family stories about my culture and its rich history, but over the years, I’ve developed a certain fondness for historical fiction set in China and since this book fell into that category based on the summary, I went into it with pretty high expectations. While overall I would say that I enjoyed reading this book well enough, the overall story didn’t really grab me as much as I thought it would, for reasons that I will talk more about below.

    Set in the 1930s in Shanghai, a naïve young Chinese girl named Xiao Feng is thrust into the world of the wealthy and powerful Sang family through a marriage arranged by her parents. This one action — her parents’ selfish, stubborn adherence to age-old superstition and tradition – upends Feng’s life and eventually turns her into an extremely bitter, resentful woman who becomes obsessed with seeking revenge against not just the people who put her in that position but also the customs and traditions, her heritage, that drove those people to take the actions they did. Spanning several decades into the 1960s, this story chronicling Feng’s coming of age and survival in a world she views as largely foreign and cruel is set against the backdrop of one of the most turbulent time periods in China’s modern history.

    Overall, I feel that this book was pretty well written. While the writing didn’t blow me away, it was definitely above average for a debut novel — descriptive where it needed to be, but not overwhelming, with language appropriate to its time period (for the most part). I started reading this book without knowing anything about the author at first and have to admit that I was surprised at the author’s extensive knowledge of Chinese culture – much of what was described in terms of Chinese customs and traditions, cultural attitudes, philosophy, superstition, relationships, etc. was spot on and it made me wonder about his background. It wasn’t until I read the Author’s note at the end of the book that the familiarity with the culture made sense to me, as the author is Eurasian – his mother is Chinese and his father is British. This book, while written for his mother in a way (he explains in the author’s note), was not actually her story, though the inspiration for some of the themes in the story (i.e. mother/daughter relationships, concept of family, etc.) as well as certain elements pertaining to the cultural background were based on his mother’s life.

    One of the things I found most interesting about this story is that the author chose to frame the narrative from the main character Xiao Feng’s first person point of view. Up until this point, I hadn’t read any books written this way (male author telling the story from the female character’s first person perspective), so for me this was a new experience. I will admit that there were certain points during the story where I actually forgot that this was written by a male, as Feng’s voice sounded so authentic at certain moments, but then later on there were parts where I totally could not understand why her character would act that way. Perhaps this is why I found it difficult to completely connect with the character of Feng, despite sympathizing with her plight (to a certain degree) and the way she was treated. Feng, while a believable character, was not likable, as her overwhelming bitterness toward the life forced upon her permeated the entire story and basically blinded her to everything going on around her. While I definitely understand why Feng turned out the way she did, it was hard for me to wrap my head around her rationale and the justification she tried to give for some of her actions, some of which were “mistakes” that she made knowingly and deliberately. I’m all for stories about women who rise up against social convention and survive against the odds, but with Feng, I felt like something was lacking that made me feel differently about her – perhaps it was the fact that the way she went about defying convention was so irrational, I wasn’t really convinced what type of person she wanted to be.

    In terms of this book being marketed as historical fiction, I actually feel that it doesn’t completely fit the category. Majority of the book is about Feng isolated in the microcosm of her home (first her family home with her parents, grandfather, and sister and later in the Sang family mansion), completely oblivious to everything going on in the world outside. As I said above, the backdrop of the story was the time period between the 1930s and early 1960s – a time period in which, for those familiar with Chinese history, so many historical events occurred that it was nearly impossible to write a story set during this time / place without having those events impact the story’s characters in some way. With this book, it wasn’t until the last quarter of the story or so that the history piece actually came into play in a significant way. To me, the best works of historical fiction are able to achieve a good balance between incorporating (accurate) historical detail and telling a compelling, captivating story and doing so in a way that weaves both into each other seamlessly. This book didn’t deliver in that aspect (as historical fiction) but as a well-written coming of age story that explores cultural and societal conventions, relationships, family, love and betrayal, etc., this book definitely worked. I would still recommend this book, as it was a good read overall, it’s just that I prefer more depth from a historical perspective.
    …more

    Patty

    Jan 07, 2012

    rated it
    it was ok

    This books shares the story of a very young, very naive girl in pre-revolution China, Feng. She is the second born and all of her mother’s energy has been poured into her elder sister. Her mother longs to enter “society” and is using the marriage of her first daughter to try and achieve this goal. When the seamstress comes to make the wedding dress Feng meets his son and imagines herself in love with him as she shares time with him in the family gardens.

    When her sister dies Feng is basically sol

    When her sister dies Feng is basically sold into the marriage her mother so much desired – to save face. Feng is totally unaware of the world around her except for the Latin names of all the flowers in the garden taught to her by her grandfather. He is against the marriage but he leaves rather than stand up to the force of his daughter in law.

    Feng enters into her new family totally unprepared for living in such a rigid household. No one has told her anything about life. My first problem with the book was that a seventeen year old girl, even in this time period could be THIS clueless. Feng did not even know what marriage was let along sex. She didn’t realize that she would be leaving her family. I found it hard to believe. She read more like a pre-teen than a seventeen year old.

    After she enters the marriage and makes her “terrible revenge” she turns into a femme fatale with her husband. Where did this woman come from? A girl who knew nothing about sex now, with no further conversation or teaching from her husband is suddenly a tease extraordinaire? This change was a bit of a stretch for me.

    The back and forth of this woman in her feelings of love and hate were like whiplash. I could totally understand why she would hate her situation but the ways she chose to deal with it were a bit extreme to say the least. It made the book less believable and that’s a shame because the writing was so good. I found myself drawn into the time and place with the flow of the words. I felt the emotions when they rang true but so many situations just felt so wrong. Maybe it is cultural? I don’t know – I have read many a book that has taken place in China in different time periods and have not felt like this. It was definitely worth reading but I won’t read it again.
    …more