Black Panther #1 by Ta-Nehisi Coates Download (read online) free eBook .pdf.epub.kindle

Black Panther #1

A new era for the Black Panther starts here! Written by MacArthur Genius and National Book Award winner TA-NEHISI COATES (Between the World and Me) and illustrated by living legend BRIAN STELFREEZE, “A Nation Under Our Feet” is a story about dramatic upheaval in Wakanda and the Black Panther’s struggle to do right by his people as their ruler. The indomitable will of Wakan

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    Anne

    T’Challa!

    description

    I wanted to like this so much, but it was a snooze-fest that took me several days to read. The art was beautiful, lush, and vibrant…which was in stark contrast to the flaky, boring, dried out dialogue.
    Too much talky, not enough action.

    description

    You know what?
    I’ve been sitting here for about 30 minutes, scrolling through Facebook posts (mostly checking out cat videos), looking at Instagram pictures (why do my friends take so many pictures of food?), reading other Goodreads reviews (sadly, they’r

    description

    I wanted to like this so much, but it was a snooze-fest that took me several days to read. The art was beautiful, lush, and vibrant…which was in stark contrast to the flaky, boring, dried out dialogue.
    Too much talky, not enough action.

    description

    You know what?
    I’ve been sitting here for about 30 minutes, scrolling through Facebook posts (mostly checking out cat videos), looking at Instagram pictures (why do my friends take so many pictures of food?), reading other Goodreads reviews (sadly, they’re all much better than mine)…because I can’t think of anything to say about this title.
    Even writing about it is boring.

    description

    *crickets chirping*
    Yeah. Ok. Well, the gist is that T’Challa is having problems in his kingdom. Several different (I think) groups are unhappy with him, and it looks like his people (or at least, some of them) might revolt.
    And, honestly, I don’t blame them. Sounds like there’s a lot of assholery going on. Now, I’m not directly blaming him, but…

    description

    And that’s it.
    shrugs
    This is not my cuppa when it comes to comic book stories, but I want to read more about Black Panther, so I think I’ll just dig around and see if there’s anything more my taste in some of the older stuff.
    After all, he seems like such a badass…

    description
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    Keith

    Oct 15, 2016

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    review of another edition

    Depending on how well you know Black Panther — and I mean not just the character, but every run on the character and every time he appears in another Marvel comic and, in fact, every time a reference has been made to any element of the character’s world, forever — A Nation Under Our Feet is either subversive and brilliant, or an unfathomable mess.

    I know nothing about Black Panther. I, like most left-leaning white comics nerds who like Batman, was just super-pumped to get a monthly comic drawn

    I know nothing about Black Panther. I, like most left-leaning white comics nerds who like Batman, was just super-pumped to get a monthly comic drawn by Brian Stelfreeze — partially because Stelfreeze is a black artist, but mainly because he’s friggin STELFREEZE — and I was super-pumped to get a book about a black superhero from a black writer. Of course, since I did not actually know anything about Black Panther, I did not know that Black Panther comics have been given to black writers for some time now, but this is part of what I’m saying — the announcement about the new Black Panther had just enough of what I understood to be cool, and enough of what sounded like a socially progressive and exciting thing I didn’t know anything about, to make this comic the thing I have been most excited about all year.

    If you read, for example, an interview with Coates (like this one at io9), what you will get is that Coates has thought about Black Panther more deeply than you. In fact, I think he’s thought about BP more deeply than a lot of writers think about their characters. He has woven together every small inference to the character, along with each of the character’s main story arcs, as if they are very, very present for the reader. It’s not that Coates is thinking like a “black writer” that is excluding (or not writing for) a wider audience. Coates is thinking like a novelist. There’s an assumption in his writing that he’s got a lot of room to provide context, backstory, and necessary histories for his characters that will bring the average reader up to speed, but because this is a comic book series and not a novel, he really doesn’t.

    This is not necessarily a bad thing. There has been something fun about reading a bunch of comics that are really well-researched and deeply developed but that do not spend much time (if any) letting the reader acclimate. Grant Morrison does this all the time — the difference being, of course, that he does them with properties I know a lot about (X-Men, Batman), and properties whose histories, I would cautiously suggest, are generally more well-known to comics nerds than that of Black Panther.

    Which is where it gets interesting. My knee-jerk response to the narrative structure of Black Panther is that it doesn’t really work. It relies heavily on things you probably do not know, and even its scene-to-scene transitions form a story that’s almost too big for what a comic has room for. Imagine the first book of Game of Thrones packed into a highlights reel and smashed into four 22-page comic books, without footnotes of any kind. That’s sort of how this book reads. As a novel-reader and a comics-reader, it’s actually kind of fun to reread the book several times (5 times at this point?), look up references to old characters and old plotlines on Wikipedia, and piece together what Coates is trying to do. But that doesn’t mean that the workload placed on the reader in order to make it through this comic feels intentional (as it often does with Morrison). It feels more like a very, very smart writer who just can’t see the forest for the trees.

    But the real interesting-ness here is the fundamental question of whether or not a comic like Black Panther even owes me what I’m asking of it. I’m used to reading either A) well-established superhero titles starring characters whose histories are practically a matter of public record or B) esoteric ‘alternative’ superhero titles resurrecting some long-gone character that do a lot of pandering, and/or throw out the rulebook so completely that there’s really nothing you need to know, going in. Black Panther does neither of these things. It just starts going and demands that you sink or swim.

    I will maintain that certain elements of the book just aren’t explained well — brand-new characters thrown into the back of a panel that might be important twenty pages later, or they might not, so fuck it — but I think there’s also a larger political question that Black Panther raises. White people (specifically white male people) are currently going through a cultural moment in which it is being made abundantly clear that not all culture is “made” for them, that in fact there are whole worlds of media, history and expression that do not, shock-of-shocks, exist solely (or at all) for white (male) people to enjoy.

    As a left-leaning white dude, I think that living through this cultural moment is a great thing. That doesn’t mean that it’s not also a little bit weird to be reminded of when I’m just sitting on my couch in my undies trying to veg out with some comics.

    I guess here’s a list of the things I’m getting at:

    1) Black Panther is an intensely nerdy, deep-cut comic that has been marketed as a great jumping-on point for new readers. It is, in fact, not.

    2) UNLESS IT IS. Unless the experience of being totally alienated and finding your way into a world you do not understand is exactly would should happen.

    3) Even if you are a total Black Panther historian, I have come to understand that this book will completely trip you out.

    WHICH BRINGS ME TO THE POINT THAT I HAVE NOT EVEN REVIEWED THIS BOOK YET.

    Black Panther is (apparently) usually written as a brilliant scientist who rules over a perfect city, like if Batman were allowed to build his own version of Gotham. What Coates has done, however, is copiously read through every BP appearance or reference ever and realized that, taken together, that is really not the story of Black Panther at all.

    In A Nation Under Our Feet, Coates takes stock and realizes that if an adventuring mad scientist actually DID ever rule a country, probably that country would fall apart in about five seconds. Then Coates points out that, considering the history of the character — the number of times his country has been invaded, destroyed, or flat-out neglected because their king was off being an Avenger — Black Panther is actually a totally shit ruler who’s got a lot of things coming to him.

    All of which makes me glad I know nothing about Black Panther, because i have a feeling that any reader who actually loves the character enough to be able to follow all this book’s threads would be insanely pissed off by what Coates is doing with him.

    Because Coates is not, in fact, using his stint on Black Panther to write some kind of BLM-Afrocentrist-Afrofuturist-empowerment action feature (which, being real with you, is exactly what I wanted to read). He is, instead, writing a book that questions every structure of power Black Panther comics usually champion — science, masculinity, military ‘peace,’ and the general ethics of superheroism.

    All of which makes TOTAL SENSE in our current cultural moment, and is yet something it never even occurred to me that I would see in this comic.

    This book makes me realize that I’m never actually going to know what I’m talking about regarding this book. I’m going to continue to read the shit out of it. The art is gorgeous and super weird-sciencey, and whether or not Coates actually knows how to write a comic, he sure as hell knows how to write a book. The series is called Black Panther, but it’s really an ensemble title about a nation of people with clearly-etched motives and desires that feel both connected to a shared history, and completely disparate from one another.

    Maybe one could argue that there’s too much talking, and not enough punching. Maybe that’s the point of what’s being challenged here. Either option is possibly true.

    I dunno. I don’t know whether or not it’s even good, but I do know that it’s pretty fucking metal, you guys.

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    Kemper

    Feb 24, 2018

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    review of another edition

    Shelves:
    comics,
    superhero,
    2018

    Guess why I read this one?

    Like the rest of the world I’ve gone Black Panther crazy after seeing the new movie, but aside from thinking he was pretty cool as a kid in the late ‘70s reading Avengers comics I wasn’t all that familiar with T’Challa or Wakanda. So this seemed like a good place to start.

    Sadly, it isn’t.

    Getting an acclaimed writer like Ta-Nehesi Coates to do your funny book shows yet again that comics aren’t just for kids any more, and there’s a lot of interesting stuff that draws on A

    Like the rest of the world I’ve gone Black Panther crazy after seeing the new movie, but aside from thinking he was pretty cool as a kid in the late ‘70s reading Avengers comics I wasn’t all that familiar with T’Challa or Wakanda. So this seemed like a good place to start.

    Sadly, it isn’t.

    Getting an acclaimed writer like Ta-Nehesi Coates to do your funny book shows yet again that comics aren’t just for kids any more, and there’s a lot of interesting stuff that draws on African history and culture. The art does a nice job of immersing a reader in the world of Wakanda. So just as a comic book it’s pretty good on the surface.

    However, the problem is that Marvel has done a piss-poor job at making their comics accessible these days. You’d think with the success of the Marvel Cinematic Universe at this point that someone in charge would have realized that fans want to read more about these characters. Yet despite way too many reboots and retcons in the last ten years since Robert Downey Jr. put on the Iron Man suit they have failed miserably at cleaning up the continuity to the point that readers can pick up a book and know what’s going on.

    This isn’t just limited to creating jumping-on points for new fans either. I’ve been reading Marvel off-and-on for going on 40 years now, I have the Marvel Unlimited subscription which gives me access to thousands of comics including newer stuff, and I have no clue what’s been happening in recent years other than managing to slog my way through Secret Wars. (And that didn’t exactly help clear things up.)

    That’s the problem here. This run of comics was released after Panther’s film introduction in Civil War and should have been a place for readers to start with or get reacquainted with T’Challa before his solo movie. Instead the story picks up after recent huge events have left Wakanda in serious trouble. I’ve read part of those stories, but even I wasn’t entirely sure of what was going on here. What chance would a kid picking up Black Panther for the first time have of making sense of it all? Plus, it doesn’t help that one of the best characters in the movie was killed before this book started. (But in true comic book fashion she is only mostly dead.)

    So even though we’ve got a title with real potential the demands of continuity of the Marvel universe force all these other recent events into it instead of providing a clean starting point. It’s the dilemma of trying to balance all the history of these characters vs. trying to let new readers into the world. It’s such a problem that even though the MCU gave the Marvel comics about 14 billion reasons to streamline stuff it’s just never happened. I know one of the reasons I like the MCU so much is that it’s the only place I get stories about these characters these days where I understand what’s going on.

    That’s the shame of this. I think if they’d have given Coates a mandate to do a soft reboot on Black Panther without worrying about fitting it into the aftermaths of countless crossovers that he might have hit it out of the park, but he was handcuffed by the same thing that makes new Marvel comics not a helluva lot of fun to read these days.

    But hey! They’ve promised a new reboot with this Fresh Start thing that sounds like maybe they finally understand what they need to do. I’m sure they’ll get it right this time…….*cough*
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