Duncan the Wonder Dog: Show One by Adam Hines Download (read online) free eBook .pdf.epub.kindle

Duncan the Wonder Dog: Show One

What if animals could talk? Would some of them form a militant group in reaction to how humans treat them? Would humans treat them different?


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    karen

    Aug 28, 2011

    rated it
    it was amazing

    this is everything mike reynolds promised it would be.

    i can’t even get close to the emotional parts of this book yet, so i will have to start with the artwork. and then i remember that i don’t really know anything about art, so don’t look for any profound art crit here. all i know is what is skillful, poignant, meaningful. there is a range of styles here, from hyper-detailed to almost unfinished-looking, depending on the mood of that portion of the story. his animals are so expressive in their f

    i can’t even get close to the emotional parts of this book yet, so i will have to start with the artwork. and then i remember that i don’t really know anything about art, so don’t look for any profound art crit here. all i know is what is skillful, poignant, meaningful. there is a range of styles here, from hyper-detailed to almost unfinished-looking, depending on the mood of that portion of the story. his animals are so expressive in their features, frequently more so than the human characters, and he has a real facility for body language. the scene with the raccoon was so short but so perfect.

    (i’m not sure how to cut and paste individual frames from sequential art online – if it moves as one “page” or as individual panels, so that’s all the artwork i am going to show.)

    (and now i know – it takes the whole page)

    there is no duncan the wonder dog. this is not about some heroic dog solving crimes or being cute. it is about the philosophical and psychological burden of the human-animal relationship that occurs when animals are unarguably fully expressive, verbally, and perfectly evolved intellectually. the image of a chimp reading pythagoras’ metaphysics behind bars waiting for his turn in the ring of the circus… in the wrong hands, it could be manipulative and schmaltzy, but he has a real skill, and all of his drawings feel *real* and potent. there is so much substance to his work – the pictures have depth and the words have density. when i was reading it, it made me think of church and state. i read that about fifteen years ago, so it is hazy, but i remember reading it (my first exposure to the “graphic novel”) and thinking – “holy shit, this is smart.” this is the same way. very smart, very textured, very complicated. there is nothing flimsy about this, nothing frivolous.

    i mean, the bundles interlude alone was enough to earn this five stars.
    nicholas sparks could have moistened the hankies of a thousand young girls given that material, but m. hines knows a little something called “restraint,” that pulls some of the violins back a little and gives the story room to breathe, all the better to kick your emotional ass.

    and he does offer the whole thing online, which is a wonderful thing, but it is massive, and it is a beautifully-designed book, so why wouldn’t you want to own it?? he encourages people not to buy it, and instead to read it online and donate money to several animal rights groups features on the site, but honestly – you probably won’t do that. you all have good intentions but rarely follow through, right? me, i bought the book, and he can do what he wants with the money. but here is the link, if you are more proactive than me: http://www.geneva-street.com/duncanth….

    seriously – big hugs to mike reynolds. a wonderful thing to have brought to the goodreads.com community.

    let me know of there is ever a “show two”
    …more

    Greg

    Jan 30, 2011

    rated it
    it was amazing

    Shelves:
    graphic-novels

    If animals could really talk like they do in cute little cartoons–you know if they could rationalize and interact with people as something like equals, but you know they still were treated the way we generally treat animals, they would be probably be pretty fucking angry.

    They might start doing things like this:


    And could you blame them?

    This graphic novel was really good, at first glance it has a sort of Chris Ware kind of look and feel to it, but a bit sloppier Ware, one that isn’t quite so geo

    If animals could really talk like they do in cute little cartoons–you know if they could rationalize and interact with people as something like equals, but you know they still were treated the way we generally treat animals, they would be probably be pretty fucking angry.

    They might start doing things like this:


    And could you blame them?

    This graphic novel was really good, at first glance it has a sort of Chris Ware kind of look and feel to it, but a bit sloppier Ware, one that isn’t quite so geometrical, and allows disorder to sometimes seep into the page. And like Chris Ware this is a gigantic book and it promises to be only the first of eight or nine books that will make up the Duncan the Wonderdog story, and also like Chris Ware you get the feeling that it’s quite possible that the story is too big, and that it will never be completed, or if it is quite possibly when you are too old to actually make out all of the great little details in the later volumes because you’re old and decrepit and your eyesight aint what it used to be. I like to ignore the fact that this book came out like seven years ago, it doesn’t make me feel optimistic that I’ll ever get to see where this story is going.

    The entire book can be read online, and the quality is pretty great, you can read it here:

    http://www.geneva-street.com/duncanth…

    or buy a very nice looking print version of the book. I’d recommend buying the book, or finding a nice person who will lend it to you and then only complain a little bit when it takes you months and months to actually read it.

    It’s violent, and smart, and sad and there are some great animals here and some really despicable humans (and some alright humans, too) and because I’m a big girl I got really sad and felt some of that liquid want to start ooze from my eyes during the journal part of the story.

    Thank you Mike Reynolds for bringing this to our attention! And thank you Karen for being so kind in lending me your copy! (click the links, read the reviews, click like, you know the drill! and here is Esteban’s too, because he said I look like a sexy roman centurion tonight, and that deserves some shameless plugging of one of his reviews.)

    Now go read it yourself.



    …more

    Seth T.

    Aug 30, 2011

    rated it
    it was amazing

    Shelves:
    comics

    Duncan the Wonder Dog by Adam Hines
    [This is a picture of Pompeii, a monkey terrorist/animal rights activist, victoriously wielding automatic weaponry in the midst of a high-speed police chase. That should be enough to sell eight million copies of this book.]

    Adam Hines is careful to avoid framing the discussion of animal and human interaction in terms of “rights.” His concern is both semantic and philosophical. Rights, as he sees them, are human inventions, distributed capriciously as the human society sees fit. He sees no rigouro

    Adam Hines is careful to avoid framing the discussion of animal and human interaction in terms of “rights.” His concern is both semantic and philosophical. Rights, as he sees them, are human inventions, distributed capriciously as the human society sees fit. He sees no rigourous foundation upon which such a thing as rights can be grounded, so instead he hopes to recast the discussion to focus on animal welfare—which, to his mind, sits in a far more objective sphere than rights do. It’s a careful distinction to make and Hines proves himself a careful author.

    In fact, Hines takes such care with his story that the curiously named Duncan the Wonder Dog can be roundly considered a triumph of the medium. I’ve had the pleasure of reading a number of great books this last year, from Daytripper to Moving Pictures to Mother, Come Home to Elmer, and Duncan is quite possibly the best I’ve yet encountered. (It’s a toss-up between that and the phenomenal Daytripper.)

    I was hesitant to pick up Duncan the Wonder Dog for two reasons. The first is the title. One could be forgiven for finding it off-putting, trite, and childish. I really didn’t have any desire to investigate a book that was a cartoonish serial adventure of some canine in a cape who solves mysteries and flies and maybe makes boo-boo-kitty eyes at a spaniel over a plate of back-alley pasta. The second obstacle was that I had already read Elmer and as that book explores a world in which chickens become sentient and uses the concept to tiptoe through some social issues, I felt I had met my talking-animals-versus-social-dilemmas quota.

    Fortunately, neither of these monuments to my reluctance ended up keeping me from the book indefinitely.

    Duncan the Wonder Dog by Adam Hines

    Duncan is a large book, in a cornucopia of senses. Certainly its four hundred pages are impressive on their own, but Hines produces a product that expands along the other two common physical dimensions as well. The book—the first volume of a projected eight—carries the height and width of a standard sheet of American notebook paper: 8 ½” x 11″. Being so large, the tome is naturally heavy as well, weighing nearly three pounds. And all of that merely touches on the book’s physical imposition—where Duncan‘s true largeness is measured is in its content.

    Hines crafts an expansive story with immense value against a tremendous ethical background on broad canvas. This is the story not of the human race but of creaturely existence. And co-existence. And through Hines’ masterful technique Duncan—for all its fantastic setting—essays a profoundly moving, astonishing set of stories, each contributing to the question of co-existence in fresh, exciting ways.

    Duncan the Wonder Dog by Adam Hines
    [There are a number of horrificly tragic scenes in this book, but this one really hit me for its tit-for-tat retributive nature.]

    Duncan‘s structure is a slow-burn. At first it’s not even clear that in this world animals can talk. And not just talk in that Watership Down sort of way, where animals have voices and can communicate amongst themselves but never to man. In Duncan the animals speak as plainly as you or I do. If you ask a whining dog what’s the matter, she can simply tell you. Once it becomes clear that this is the kind of world that Hines is populating with his characters, a reader still has a hundred or so pages before the books’ protagonists are firmly establish.

    Hines uses a lot of collage throughout his book to give it a distinct aesthetic, but the form of collage extends even to his storytelling style. Despite the fact that the book does follow (probably) four main characters through its story, Hines takes frequent, numerous narrative breaks to focus on minor characters or even non-characters for a page or fifteen. Sometimes these excursions paint in an emotional palette while other examples feature a discussion of philosophy. I found myself conflicted, not wanting to be torn from whatever sidebar Hines had just introduced and the excitement of watching the main branch continue to unfurl. Hines balances between his subjects with a virtuosity one has to experience firsthand.


    Duncan the Wonder Dog by Adam Hines

    [Hines here does a wonderful job conveying a man’s life flashing before his eyes. Click to enlarge.]

    Duncan is a dense work. There are a lot of words on a lot of pages, but even more than that, Hines’ pages of art demand scrutiny. His art serves his story and his story serves his art. It’s possible that this volume represents the most ambitious use of the comics form yet. There may be other contenders, but I don’t think I’ve seen them. This is a book that deserves second and third readings. Which makes it nice that the first reading was such an absolute pleasure.

    Note:
    I neglected to give any kind of summary of the book’s plot or story conceit or anything that might hint at what Duncan the Wonder Dog is actually about. I’m not sure that it’s even important for you to know. The book is that good. Good enough that you should go pick it up and sound out its reaches knowing nothing beyond the seal of its quality. Still, some may require a, quote-unquote, low-down.

    The world presented in Duncan is one that mirrors ours almost exactly—save for the fact that animals can express themselves in the language of humans. This doesn’t change much about the world order. Cattle and pigs are still herded into pens and raised for the slaughter. Dogs and cats still live as pets. And foxes still prey on rabbits. The difference is that now the cows spread rumours about why none of them ever return after leaving for the slaughterhouse while the humans who are slaughtering them lie to them, explaining that the very idea of such murder houses is just silly. Animals (with a few humans) have formed activist groups, some of which have become full-blown terrorist cells. ORAPOST is one such group and it is helmed (for the moment at least) by a golden macaque named Pompeii whose attitude and methodology are as explosive as her name. It’s a world with frayed edges, coming undone even as it seeks to forge itself into something worthwhile.

    Hines offers the series online for free. The impressively sized bound volume is for sale, but Hines suggests that “if you are considering purchasing this book, please instead give that money” to one of a number of animal-friendly organizations. Only after you’ve done that does he present the idea that his book is actually for sale.

    Duncan the Wonder Dog by Adam Hines
    [Review courtesy of Good Ok Bad]
    …more