Embroideries by Marjane Satrapi Download (read online) free eBook .pdf.epub.kindle

Embroideries

From the best–selling author of Persepolis comes this gloriously entertaining and enlightening look into the sex lives of Iranian women. Embroideries gathers together Marjane’s tough–talking grandmother, stoic mother, glamorous and eccentric aunt and their friends and neighbors for an afternoon of tea drinking and talking. Naturally, the subject turns to love, sex and the
Pramod Nair

To speak behind others’ backs is to ventilate the soul.” – a dictum from Marjane Satrapi’s grandmother.

Reading ‘Embroideries’ from Marjane Satrapi was like reading some missing pages from ‘Persepolis’, her renowned autobiographical series. In ‘Persepolis’ she gave much insights to the reader about the social and political life of Iran during her childhood, but through ‘Embroideries‘ Satrapi manages to illustrate the closed personal world of Iranian women in an amusing manner.

In this slice of an

Reading ‘Embroideries’ from Marjane Satrapi was like reading some missing pages from ‘Persepolis’, her renowned autobiographical series. In ‘Persepolis’ she gave much insights to the reader about the social and political life of Iran during her childhood, but through ‘Embroideries‘ Satrapi manages to illustrate the closed personal world of Iranian women in an amusing manner.

In this slice of an autobiography, Satrapi let’s the reader experience the joy, sorrow, disappointments and frustrations narrated from the personal viewpoint of a bunch of charming, highly spirited and intelligent female characters living in Tehran during early 1990s. The effortless gossipy manner in which they discuss their private lives, which Satrapi captures in her Spartan yet fluid black and white illustrations, are equally touching and a delight to read.

Observing a young Satrapi in the company of her mother, grand mother, aunts and other female friends sitting around their tea – while the male members are enjoying a nap after a family dinner – and gossiping, is an experience like the observer is right among them sipping tea – at times even feeling like a voyeur – and listening to their confidential lives, their anxieties, their own personal struggle against social and personal oppression and their intimate feelings of guilt and pleasure.

There is no inhibition among the members of such an intimate gathering – where Satrapi’s grandmother takes the central stage and regulates the flow of this family chronicle – and no topic is a taboo on such an occasion and the reader is privileged to hear a string of anecdotes and ruminations, which can be funny and raunchy, at times sad or even provocative and controversial. They discuss their sex life, their fantasies, about keeping up the appearances for the sake of saving marriages, about getting an ‘embroidery’ done – a slang term for a hymenorrhaphy or hymenoplasty -, about performing plastic surgeries, about the obsessions of the society on the virginity of a girl, about homosexuality, about failed marriages, about extramarital affairs, all with a casual grace and traits of independence even under restrains imposed by their society.

The charm of the book is in its simplicity of narration. It merely narrates these thoughts as conversations aimed at the reader while offering no solutions, conclusions or judgments for the various issues discussed by its participants. It is left for the reader to think about. A perfect candidate for light weight reading, but if you are reading Satrapi’s works for the first time, then I will recommend ‘Persepolis’ before enjoying ‘Embroideries’.

Actual Rating: 3.5 / 5
…more

Rebecca McNutt

I rarely if ever read books on the subject of sex or marriage, but Embroideries is about much more than these things. It’s about normal women who have adapted to oppression and learned how to expertly hide who they really are. It’s about the thrill of secrets, the fear of being caught and the brief taste of freedom that comes along with living in such uncertain times. It’s about fashion, fun and also fright. Told in beautiful illustrations from the author of the equally incredible Persepolis, Em

…more