Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Download (read online) free eBook .pdf.epub.kindle

Happiness: Lessons from a New Science

There is a paradox at the heart of our lives. We all want more money, but as societies become richer, they do not become happier. This is not speculation: It’s the story told by countless pieces of scientific research. We now have sophisticated ways of measuring how happy people are, and all the evidence shows that on average people have grown no happier in the last fifty
Realini

Feb 01, 2017

rated it
it was amazing

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review of another edition

Shelves:
read-again,
spiritual

Happiness- Lessons From A New Science by Richard Layard

Another version of this note and thoughts on other books are available at:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… and http://realini.blogspot.ro/

This is a Fantastic book.
Really!

It touches so many aspects of happiness that I am in awe.
From Bhutan to the Academy Awards Winners.
From taxation to teaching morals in schools.

The different indicators that make the differences in well being levels between countries are revealed.
They are:

– Levels o

Another version of this note and thoughts on other books are available at:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… and http://realini.blogspot.ro/

This is a Fantastic book.
Really!

It touches so many aspects of happiness that I am in awe.
From Bhutan to the Academy Awards Winners.
From taxation to teaching morals in schools.

The different indicators that make the differences in well being levels between countries are revealed.
They are:

– Levels of trust
– Proportion of people belonging to social entities
– Unemployment figures
– Divorce rates
– Quality of government
– Religious belief

Alas, we have a government that is rightly called “The Red Plague”
And looking around the world to the likes of Trump, Erdogan, Fillon, Putin, Maduro, Duterte, Xi and their buddies it is likely that happiness levels will be affected in those lands.

Status is important for life satisfaction and…life expectancy.
Civil servants tested in the UK have had different levels of cholesterol and other important parameters.

Those in important positions, with higher status lived four or five years longer than the others, who were lower in the hierarchy.

And a strange fact:

Academy Awards nominees have been looked at.
Those who won the Award went on to live longer, four years more than the others who had been nominated but lost.

Bhutan is an interesting, exceptional case.
Their king has decided to look at the Gross Happiness Level and not at the GDP.

Alas, this happened in 1999, but one year later he has decided to allow television and public advertising.
After that, levels of aggression and conflict have risen steeply.

This was confirmed in studies made in remote regions of Canada, after the introduction of television.

The author is right in saying that information would be excellent, but ads make people want things they don’t need.

And then the rat race is a plague upon our houses.

The example of the Dalai Lama might be revealing

He went into a big department store and said something like:

Wow, so many things that I don’t need.

Or the other story of the Mexican fishermen visited by entrepreneurial Gringos…

– Why don’t buy another fishing boat?
– What for?
– Well, to expand
– And then…
– You can buy a few more
– So…
– Make money and then retire near the beach and play with kids and grandkids…
– But we are doing that already

Layard is of the opinion that taxes might work.
First of all, one reason for unhappiness is the huge gap between those at the top and the rest.

Then excessive work might need to be taxed, so that people find a better balance…maybe like the Mexican fishermen?

Fabulous, extraordinary masterpiece.

…more

Brian

Jan 06, 2013

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liked it

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review of another edition

This book was pretty interesting. Layard is an economist and he talks about how it would seem better for nations to use a measure of happiness as a marker of progress rather than gross national product. He does a good job of evaluating the science of happiness (enough to satisfy my rather critical eye) and concludes that we can now measure happiness well enough in a meaningful way. The book ranges from the science of happiness, to the economics of producing happiness, and to the spiritual aspect

…more