Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon Download (read online) free eBook .pdf.epub.kindle

Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science

Alternate cover for this ISBN can be found here

Two hundred and fifty years ago, the Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus set out to order and name the entire living world and ended up founding a science: the field of scientific classification, or taxonomy. Yet, in spite of Linnaeus’s pioneering work and the genius of those who followed him, from Darwin to E. O. Wilson, taxonomy

Two hundred and fifty years ago, the Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus set out to order and name the entire living world and ended up founding a science: the field of scientific classification, or taxonomy. Yet, in spite of Linnaeus’s pioneering work and the genius of those who followed him, from Darwin to E. O. Wilson, taxonomy went from being revered as one of the most significant of intellectual pursuits to being largely ignored. Today, taxonomy is viewed by many as an outdated field, one nearly irrelevant to the rest of science and of even less interest to the rest of the world.

Now, as Carol Kaesuk Yoon, biologist and longtime science writer for the New York Times, reminds us in Naming Nature, taxonomy is critically important, because it turns out to be much more than mere science. It is also the latest incarnation of a long-unrecognized human practice that has gone on across the globe, in every culture, in every language since before time: the deeply human act of ordering and naming the living world.

In Naming Nature, Yoon takes us on a guided tour of science’s brilliant, if sometimes misguided, attempts to order and name the overwhelming diversity of earth’s living things. We follow a trail of scattered clues that reveals taxonomy’s real origins in humanity’s distant past. Yoon’s journey brings us from New Guinea tribesmen who call a giant bird a mammal to the trials and tribulations of patients with a curious form of brain damage that causes them to be unable to distinguish among living things.

Finally, Yoon shows us how the reclaiming of taxonomy—a renewed interest in learning the kinds and names of things around us—will rekindle humanity’s dwindling connection with wild nature. Naming Nature has much to tell us, not only about how scientists create a science but also about how the progress of science can alter the expression of our own human nature.
…more


The Book in English!


Download Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon free eBook pdf mobi epub mp3 fb2 CD txt doc kindle Ibook iOS:


Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon (0.00 USD)


Download Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon eBook Free:

MIRROR-2

Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon.pdf (USD-0.00)
Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon.epub (USD-0.00)
Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon.doc (USD-0.00)
Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon.txt (USD-0.00)
Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon.mobi (USD-0.00)


Join hundreds of thousands of satisfied members who previously spent countless hours searching for media and content online, now enjoying the hottestnew games, music, books, movies & software on our site.
It’s here and it’s free. Here’s why you should join:


  • Unlimited books, magazines and comics, wherever you go: directly in your browser on your computer or tablet.
  • More than 10 million titles spanning every genre imaginable, at your fingertips.
  • Get the best books, magazines and comics in all genres, including action, adventure, anime, manga, children and family, classic, , Horror, Music, Romance, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Sport and more.
  • New titles are added every day! We want to keep things new.
  • All platforms. Fully optimized
  • Find out why thousands of people go every day.Sign up and enjoy your entertainment, unlimited!


    TAGS:
    Online Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon eBook, Book Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon FB2, download Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon PDF , Download Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon MOBI, Online Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon eBook, free download Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon IPhone, Online ebook Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon PDF, Free Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon DJVU, Free download Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon TXT, Download Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon RTF, Online Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon FB2 , eBook Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon download TXT, Free Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon download eBook, Book Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon download MOBI, download Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon IPad, read Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon MOBI, Read online Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon DOC, Free Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon AWZ, Download eBook Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon iPad , Free Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon DJVU, Download Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon eBook free, Free download Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon DVD, Read online Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon TXT, Book Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon download DJVU, Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon download book free, Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon download book pdf free, Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon pdf book download free, Download eBook Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon pdf free, Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon download free epup, Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon ePub book download free, download eBook Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon, Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon download free pdf, Naming Nature: The Clash Between Instinct and Science by Carol Kaesuk Yoon download eBooks free.

    Dr. Carl Ludwig Dorsch

    Nov 25, 2009

    rated it
    it was ok

    Shelves:
    reality

    “The human mind evolved to believe in the gods. It did not evolve to believe in biology.” – E. O. Wilson

    One reason I read few books is that they are usually written by human persons, and I have a dim view of the human person. On the other hand of course, books produced by editorial committee usually suffer from their own incoherence and disorganization, which perhaps suggests an equally dim prospect for human cooperation.

    “Naming Nature” is written by a very evident individual and centers on a

    “The human mind evolved to believe in the gods. It did not evolve to believe in biology.” – E. O. Wilson

    One reason I read few books is that they are usually written by human persons, and I have a dim view of the human person. On the other hand of course, books produced by editorial committee usually suffer from their own incoherence and disorganization, which perhaps suggests an equally dim prospect for human cooperation.

    “Naming Nature” is written by a very evident individual and centers on a single organizing principle, described by the author as a revelation of sorts: that humans possess an intuitive native sense of the organization of the “natural world,” a sense made manifest (though there much extended and elaborated) in traditional Linnaean taxonomy. Upon this the author hangs a sketch of the history of the naming and organization of the planet’s species through Linnaeus, Darwin, Mendel, Mayr, numeric and molecular taxonomic methods, and finally contemporary (and wholly evolutionarily determined) cladistics and systematics.

    Dr. Yoon connects her claim of an innate human understanding of biological organization with that fairly standard history-of-science narrative in terms of ever an increasing conflict and contradiction, observing the descriptions of taxonomy growing ever more distant and removed from life as experienced.

    Then, with this widening gulf in mind, she turns to what she holds to be the public’s indifference and/or incomprehension in the face of scientific authority’s report on the planet’s various biological crises (of bio-diversity, “the sixth great extinction,” the health of non-biological natural systems, etc.), suggesting that this unresponsiveness is the result, at least in some significant part, of the growing distance between the premises and language of natural science and the public’s “natural” sense of things.

    However, much as this public policy dilemma might seem to be the intended pinnacle of her argument, that issue is not, evidently, the real point at all. The actual protagonist of “Naming Nature” is the “umwelt,” a term Dr. Yoon has appropriated from the work of Jakob von Uexküll (1864–1944), an invertebrate researcher who early in the 20th century, apparently taking Kant to heart, began to focus on the phenomenology of the animals he studied, hoping to explore them “as subjects, not objects.” (To the extent Uexküll became preoccupied with the internal dynamics of his species’ umwelt, his work seems now mainly grist for semioticians and cybernetic studies.)

    And from this attempt to map the cognitive feedback loops of ticks, sea urchins and amoebae, Dr. Yoon has derived her own rather diminished human analog, that of our species’ ostensible inborn ordering of the plants and animals we encounter.

    In describing her use of the term, Yoon enlists a fair amount of more or less suggestive evidence. Among the more persuasive: a universal similarity in the anthropological record of folk taxonomies, the wide instance of human binomial naming (from pin oak to New York to Lao Tze), and the dramatic phenomenon of discrete neurological deficit leading to the inability to name or recognize, exclusively, living things.

    Those examples, however, stand among a flood of alleged umwelt manifestations in “Naming Nature,” some registering almost as mere curiosities, if that: the “fact” that folk taxonomies and perhaps human memory (as suggested by the listings of Dioscorides, her own husband and others) might self-limit at 500 to 600 genera, and that those folk taxonomies regularly correlate species as “brother,” “sister,” or “parent” species; that many non-human species are able to name, sort and communicate varieties of creatures (usually predators) active in their environments; that in a large-sample study students unfamiliar with the Huambisa language (of the Peruvian rain forest) scored a 58% hit rate identifying Huambisa species names as either fish or fowl; and that, of her own daughter’s first 25 spoken words, 13 of them referred to living things…

    On the same tack as the last example Yoon also considers the decoration of North American children’s rooms (all those little bunnies, duckies, teddy bears and other stuffed animals) and the tales those children are told: “The Cat in the Hat,” “Peter Rabbit,” “Winnie-the-Pooh,” etc.

    And occasionally she wanders still farther afield, as when (after suggesting the mysteries of chicken sexing are somehow umwelt related) she considers the modern excellence in commercial taxonomy, the skills displayed in navigating a world of brands and logos, the naming and recognizing of the creatures of commerce, the Nikes, McDonalds, M&Ms, Fords, etc., citing along the way a Dutch study in which two year olds demonstrated their proficiency at identifying brands as distant from their lives as Mercedes, Heineken and Camel – a line of thought easily casting more doubt on the biological essence of her umwelt theory than clearly reinforcing it.

    As we’ve seen, Yoon often points to the child’s apprehension of the natural world, and it might not be too unfair to characterize her umwelt claim in those terms: we humans possess a simple, innate, likely hardwired mode of perception for the organization of the species around us: There are trees. There are shrubs. There are flowers. There are birds, fish and creepy-crawly things. And not only are there dogs, but there are poodle dogs, German shepherd dogs, daschund dogs, terrier dogs, etc. Not only trees but maple trees, and not only maple trees but silver maple trees, red maple trees, Norway maple trees, etc. This is how we naturally think: rather like children, but in a mode capable of Linnaean extension and sophistication.

    However, Yoon reminds us, science has come to claim otherwise. There actually are no fish, per se, systematics instructs. Whales are related to camels and hippopotami, lungfish more akin to cows than salmon, birds are dinosaurs, etc. Our minds, she argues, have turned against themselves. The book’s subtitle is: “The Clash Between Instinct and Science.”

    So, what is Dr. Yoon describing?

    First of all she is describing what, notwithstanding Science’s great expedition from the prima facie to the occult, remains still nameless: the biota, the bios, the creature systematics (so far) insists we are, the enormous assemblage of familiar cellular and subcellular routines occupying the planet’s skin from miles below its surface to miles above it, much varied in accidentals but apparently essentially one in gist (if not quite in simple lineage), the many billion year old multiform entity presently sending tracers (microbial, for the most part) out into and beyond our star system.

    And when human language (or English at least) at last gives this thing a common name, will it be some defeat of our special “human nature” as manifest in Dr. Yoon’s umwelt? A victory for our nonhuman identity? For the mind? For truth?

    Then secondly, Dr. Yoon is describing the mind, the mind at work.

    The obvious fact that the history of many, if not most human disciplines follows a trajectory similar to that of taxonomy is not commented upon. As these too have become increasingly specialized and esoteric, a good many of the recent claims of mathematics, astronomy, geology, microbiology, even human history itself, might be seen as equally absurd on their face and likewise counter to our presumed and intuited understandings of the world.

    (And the works of our hands? 100 floor buildings, 200,000 ton ships, mile long bridge spans? None of these are conceivable without modes of analysis far beyond the sensible, the familiar, the expected, the intuitive or the obvious.)

    And is it because this sort of discrepancy is so obvious that “Naming Nature” never names it? Or is it rather that if named, it might suggest something of a category error, at least by omission, on Dr. Yoon’s part?

    That there are discrete areas (of some kind) of the human brain strongly implicated in the naming and recognition of plants and animals (as there are as well for the naming and recognition of faces, facial emotions, colors, clothing, letters, body parts, tools, abstract vs. concrete entities, naturally occurring vs. manufactured entities, fruits and vegetables, place names, verbs, etc.) is, like so many reports of anomia generally, strangely fascinating and almost irresistible in its apparent hint at some profound root of humanity, if not some deeper essence of mind and matter. But as the above parenthetical catalog suggests, that particular aphasia is hardly unique.

    Children can indeed be regularly fascinated with learning complicated dinosaur (and Pokeman) taxonomies, but those propensities (to whatever extent they are universal, or have universal analogs) neither seem exceptional nor hardly even remarkable in view of the larger landscape of human cognitive development ranging from the acquisition of handedness, language and number, the flowering of complex make-believe and story-telling activities, through the hundreds of other stereotypical behaviors our species’ children are thrall to.

    Finally, whether or not Dr. Yoon has produced a convincing demonstration of the special corner of human phenomenology she has tagged the “umwelt,” that demonstration would not be, in itself, an identification of the crux of “The Clash Between Instinct and Science.” Dr. Yoon’s umwelt (and her umwelt conflict) are ultimately only an instance of something wider and deeper than the conflict between our apprehension of other species and the evolving sophistication of modern natural science, and that she does not bring herself to consider that broader view eventually leaves “Naming Nature” frustratingly lacking and disappointingly naive.

    It is hard of course to fault a history of taxonomy for not unraveling the knots of human consciousness, but Yoon has, quite self-consciously, stepped beyond any attempt at simple history and into that other larger realm. That departure I have no argument with, contextualization is a good thing, investigation of the implicit ground of an argument a good thing. My argument is simply that Dr. Yoon never really does either, never passes beyond her umwelt antechamber, nor even acknowledges it as such. So amazed by the unexpected discovery of this umwelt space and the illumination it apparently provides, she never proceeds to qualify or contextualize the place itself.

    Given the turn her volume took (to her own admitted surprise) I would have taken a single chapter (at least) of such context. A recognition of the peculiarities of human intellection generally, a bit of serious reflection on the relation of things, thought and language and the business of experience and perception, ideation and abstraction, on the nature of mind in short, even if not a full essay on phenomenology, critical philosophy, or current thinking in the philosophy or neurology of consciousness.

    In the end though, perhaps I misspoke when suggesting the protagonist of “Naming Nature” was Dr. Yoon’s umwelt. In a real sense the protagonist of “Naming Nature” is Carol Yoon herself and its story is that of her umwelt epiphany; it is a conversion narrative full of the biography, confused excitement and enthusiasm (along with a bit of naive prescription) conversion accounts regularly entail.

    And like many converts to a newly discovered grand organizing principle – the Freudian or Marxist economy, the Masonic conspiracy or even the presence of an attentive deity – it seems Dr. Yoon cannot imagine the insights of her epiphany as ever being less than central to the history of life and mind on the planet, rather than merely an aspect of it.

    Eventually perhaps all epiphanies require curing, all need to shrink a bit to be finally and profitably integrated into a broader fabric of thought and understanding.

    Even God maybe, once met, has to be put in place. If so, likely also the activities of the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fusiform gyrus.


    …more

    Debbie

    Apr 09, 2011

    rated it
    liked it

    Fascinating book about the history of scientific classification of nature that started with Linneaus. This is a book about the history of taxonomy. I never knew that his classifications were replace in the 80’s with a h ole new system. Author goes on a bit too long about the “ummwelt”, the built-in view of ordering that humans have in their brains. I skipped a chapter or two.

    Christy

    Preliminary review: I’m giving this two stars instead of one solely because I now know more about the history of taxonomy than I did before and have discovered that it’s actually interesting (even if I did have to sort through Yoon’s language and ridiculous argument to get at that history). Longer review to come.