S’enfuir. Récit d’un otage. by Guy Delisle Download (read online) free eBook .pdf.epub.kindle

S'enfuir. Récit d'un otage.

En 1997, alors qu’il est responsable d’une ONG médicale dans le Caucase, Christophe André a vu sa vie basculer du jour au lendemain après avoir été enlevé en pleine nuit et emmené, cagoule sur la tête, vers une destination inconnue. Guy Delisle l’a rencontré des années plus tard et a recueilli le récit de sa captivité – un enfer qui a duré 111 jours. Que peut-il se passer

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    Kevin Kelsey

    Apr 29, 2017

    rated it
    it was amazing

     · 
    review of another edition

    Shelves:
    _library,
    read-2017

    Posted at Heradas Review

    I’m convinced that graphic novels are the perfect form for historical accounts and memoirs. Like film it’s partly a visual medium, but it’s free from the tropes, narrative boundaries, and language of film. It’s also firmly in the realm of literature, but free from the usual trappings of that medium as well. It has all of the strengths of both, and few of their weaknesses. The story can be presented in a simpler language, straightforward and raw, and this often gives it a

    I’m convinced that graphic novels are the perfect form for historical accounts and memoirs. Like film it’s partly a visual medium, but it’s free from the tropes, narrative boundaries, and language of film. It’s also firmly in the realm of literature, but free from the usual trappings of that medium as well. It has all of the strengths of both, and few of their weaknesses. The story can be presented in a simpler language, straightforward and raw, and this often gives it a lot more emotional impact. In several ways historical accounts feels more real, and more personal when presented in panels. There’s a long history of doing just that: Persepolis, Maus, and last year’s March for example were all exemplary, and Hostage belongs right alongside them.

    Delisle has done admirable work capturing the disorientation of Christophe’s hostage experience. The language barrier between him and his captors keeps him entirely in the dark as to why he’s been kidnapped, where he’s being held, what the status of negotiations (if any) for his release are, etc. His world is reduced to 4 walls and a ceiling. The reader is kept in the dark right there along with Christophe, experiencing his story as he tells it. Noises and events occur outside of his view and understanding, and he’s left only to guess what they are; constructing his greater world from fantasy. His mind escapes through his love of military history, as he attempts to lose himself in some of the great battles of Napoleon and the American Civil War.

    The illustration uses subtlety and simplicity to emphasize how slight the differences in Christophe’s day-to-day life become while in captivity. For example, the thin light moving across the wall shows how his perception of time has been drastically reduced. It’s absence after he’s moved to a more tightly controlled area, is devastating. This isn’t said, but subtly shown. There’s a story unfolding in the words, and more detail unfolding in the illustrations. They meld together, and create the greater story where they overlap. It’s fantastically well done.

    Occasionally a new person feeds him, or forgets to, or leaves him uncuffed at night. Sometimes he’s allowed a shower, sometimes his captors offer him a cigarette. The most heartbreaking part of this for me was the hyper excitement that Christophe experienced at the most basic of pleasures; things I take for granted every day of my life. Finding some Garlic in a storeroom that he’s kept in, and eating it after months of the same soup and bread day after day puts him into a state of euphoric bliss unlike anything I’ve ever experienced. That hit me really hard. When your life consists of being handcuffed to a radiator for months, any little deviation from the norm is the highest peak imaginable. At one point he’s given an omelette, and nearly forgets that he’s a captive, it’s so indescribably delicious to him.

    Christophe obviously lived to tell his story to Delisle, but I’ll leave that resolution up to you to discover for yourselves. I will say that it’s quite a nerve wracking ordeal, and the most thrilling part of this book. I highly recommend checking it out.
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    Lola  Reviewer

    This is a real story. It took the author fifteen years to finish this nonfiction book.

    A man is kidnapped as he is doing humanitarian work in Nazran in 1997. He doesn’t understand what is happening, seeing that he is working for an NGO and has no conflict whatsoever with the country or leaders of Russia.

    He thinks maybe they want the money from the safe, but they don’t seem to be interested in the keys that open it, which are located in his pockets. So Christophe spends his time locked away wonder

    A man is kidnapped as he is doing humanitarian work in Nazran in 1997. He doesn’t understand what is happening, seeing that he is working for an NGO and has no conflict whatsoever with the country or leaders of Russia.

    He thinks maybe they want the money from the safe, but they don’t seem to be interested in the keys that open it, which are located in his pockets. So Christophe spends his time locked away wondering what his abductors want and when he will be released.

    This is a very repetitive story. I want to make that extremely clear, because not much actually happens in it. However, that is to be expected or at least understood. After all, Christophe can’t control anything. He is manacled, locked, starved… He has no way of escaping or contacting someone.

    He spends months thinking—reassuring himself that everything will be alright soon enough. He can only go on if he knows there is hope. The truth is, that is the only thing that keeps him going. In fact, when everything is taken away from you—your family, rights, liberty, life—the only thing that can keep you from losing your mind is the thought of one day getting those things back in some way.

    That is exactly why Christophe keeps sane. He thinks of his sister, the beautiful city of Paris and unimportant, but soothing to him, historical facts/events/characters.

    Although it’s a slow-paced and repetitive story, it’s also rather suspenseful, especially since, like Christophe himself, you never know when the torture will end. It might be in the next page, chapter or never. You just don’t know, so you keep on reading, because you can’t imagine yourself giving up on this book, and by extension, giving up on Christophe.

    At least, that’s how I felt.

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    Michael Finocchiaro

    Guy Delisle always does a great job with understatement and can pass beautiful and strong messages with minimalist drawing and text. I loved his books on Shenzen, Pyongyang, Burma and Jerusalem where he was working as a cartoonist and they were autobiographical accounts. This one was quite different as it dealt with the kidnapping and captivity of a humanitarian activist, Christophe André held for over 100 days in 1997 in Chechnia. It is told simply with a spare black, white, grey and occasional

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