The Girls by Emma Cline Download (read online) free eBook .pdf.epub.kindle

The Girls

Northern California, during the violent end of the 1960s. At the start of summer, a lonely and thoughtful teenager, Evie Boyd, sees a group of girls in the park, and is immediately caught by their freedom, their careless dress, their dangerous aura of abandon. Soon, Evie is in thrall to Suzanne, a mesmerizing older girl, and is drawn into the circle of a soon-to-be infamou

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    Justin

    Jun 23, 2016

    rated it
    it was ok

    I’m turning a corner here, Goodreaders. The old me would rate this book two stars and spend some time telling you how awful the book is and all the reasons I couldn’t stand it, etc.

    But, that’s the old me.

    I’m turning a corner. Turning over a new leaf. Doing a 180. Whatever.

    At least for this review.

    People I know, love, and respect really, really like this book. I completely get it, too. I absolutely understand how you could read this book and think it’s amazing and get all caught up in the sto

    But, that’s the old me.

    I’m turning a corner. Turning over a new leaf. Doing a 180. Whatever.

    At least for this review.

    People I know, love, and respect really, really like this book. I completely get it, too. I absolutely understand how you could read this book and think it’s amazing and get all caught up in the story and the characters and be transported back to that crazy time in our nation’s history.

    I just didn’t connect with this book at any point, ever. I wanted to. I felt like I should have. I just didn’t. I read it, never really cared, got to the end, shrugged, got off the couch, and made myself a sandwich.

    The sandwich thing happens after I finish every book, not just bad ones, and especially not just this one. Sometimes it’s cereal or maybe an apple, but who really cares about my post-reading eating habits that may or may not be really a thing anyway?

    Feel free to message me for more info.

    I read Helter Skelter in high school and that book was… way too long for a high school kid to read. I mean, it was a great read, fascinating, unbelievable, hard to even rationalize that it was a real event. Crazy.

    This stupid book… Wait, I’m turning a corner…

    This book took real events, changed the characters names, and did nothing creative outside of that. It was fine, I guess. It’s not worth whatever advance she got from Random House, and it’s not worth the attention it’s getting. It’s not written very well, often comes across as too pretentious and trying too hard to be awesome, and ultimately forgettable.

    Sorry… I’m trying to change….

    Hang on…

    But, people like it and that’s great. Sometimes books don’t grab me the same way, and The Girls and I had a bad first date and still tried to make it work. It was doomed from the start, but I read it, it was short, and I can now move on to other books.

    Have a good night everyone.
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    Emily May

    DNF

    I very rarely put aside books after reading just a prologue and one chapter, but I cannot make myself suffer through any more of this. My stomach was coiling with dread each time I even thought about pushing through another 300+ pages of this overwritten prose.

    I ate in the blunt way I had as a child—a glut of spaghetti, mossed with cheese. The nothing jump of soda in my throat.

    I tended to the in-between spaces of other people’s existences, working as a live-in aide. Cultivating a genteel inv


    I very rarely put aside books after reading just a prologue and one chapter, but I cannot make myself suffer through any more of this. My stomach was coiling with dread each time I even thought about pushing through another 300+ pages of this overwritten prose.

    I ate in the blunt way I had as a child—a glut of spaghetti, mossed with cheese. The nothing jump of soda in my throat.

    I tended to the in-between spaces of other people’s existences, working as a live-in aide. Cultivating a genteel invisibility in sexless clothes, my face blurred with the pleasant, ambiguous expression of a lawn ornament.

    I’m sure a certain type of reader will love this, but that reader is not me. Out of curiosity, though, what’s with the Manson-related stories? I just finished My Favourite Manson Girl, and now we have this book, which is based on the Manson cult and tells how Evie Boyd gets drawn into it. Did I miss something?

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    Debbie

    Holy moly, I LOVED this one! My first 5-star book this year!

    I’m a sucker for a female narrator talking about what she had to have, what she didn’t get, what she really meant, what she should have done. I like all that talking in the head. I make it sound sort of light and funny but there is nothing light or funny about 14-year-old Evie. She seems to be living a typically boring life when she sees a girl in the park…and an obsession begins. Her ordinary life hits the extraordinary, and pow, right

    I’m a sucker for a female narrator talking about what she had to have, what she didn’t get, what she really meant, what she should have done. I like all that talking in the head. I make it sound sort of light and funny but there is nothing light or funny about 14-year-old Evie. She seems to be living a typically boring life when she sees a girl in the park…and an obsession begins. Her ordinary life hits the extraordinary, and pow, right in the kisser.

    I worried that this would be just another teenage-girl-angst book. It was so not that (I say in my best valley-girl voice). This is a tale of big-time obsession, not your humdrum harmless crush. Just Evie’s bad luck, really: the crowd is bad and her age works against her. Can Evie help it that her cerebral cortex isn’t developed well enough for her to even have a chance of sensing danger or making good decisions? Her moral compass isn’t showing a clear direction yet; she doesn’t have a clue how dangerous or wrong it all is.

    Evie tells two stories—one about what is happening to her right now and one about what happened to her back then. The back and forth is seamless and works well. What also works well is the tension. We can see the train wreck about to happen, but Evie cannot. Her innocence and her vulnerability are palpable; you want to reach into the story and shake her. Or chain her to the bedpost until she’s legal.

    The language is to die for—lots of cool imagery and nice sophisticated sentences. And though I would say this is a cerebral read, it’s also accessible. There’s not a whole lot of action, but it’s not slow. It’s super profound and really good at getting inside a 14-year-old’s head. And let’s not forget the setting: this was my time (chamomile tea and long flowered skirts included), and the author has it down perfectly. As with so many others, my horror at the Manson murders also includes a morbid fascination, so I was glued to the page trying to understand how a control freak becomes charismatic and succeeds in putting people into trances.

    One thing I wasn’t crazy about is the fact that all men are pretty much portrayed as obscene; I’m thinking this might bug guy readers.

    This book still has me thinking about What Ifs, even though I read it weeks ago. I’m certain that the What Ifs are still haunting Evie too (it’s a pretty good book if I’m acting like Evie is a real person!). She has been to the other side, and like others who have been there, she forever after will be just going through the motions, a heavy cloud following above her. Yep, this is one dark book—it’s at times pretty creepy and disturbing. Fear, desire, vulnerability, idol worship, loneliness, danger, mind-fucking—all are part of the darkness.

    This book reminded me a bit of two other favorites, Aquarium (strong tone and imagery) and The Woman Upstairs (girl obsession, first-person narration, cerebral). I just loved this book’s language, imagery, psychological insight, soul. I’m super impressed by this debut—I will wait eagerly for Cline’s next book.

    Thanks to NetGalley for the advance copy.

    P.S. I’m all messed up about this being called historical fiction! Historical fiction is supposed to be pre-1950s, right? Historical fiction is not supposed to EVER be happening during my lifetime! I mean, come on, lol! What are these young whippersnapper genre-namers thinking?

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