The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson Download (read online) free eBook .pdf.epub.kindle

The Illearth War (The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever, #2)

After scant days in his “real” world, Thomas Covenant found himself again summoned to the Land. There forty bitter years had passed, while Lord Foul, immortal enemy of the Land, moved to fulfill his prophecy of doom.

The Council of Lords found their spells useless, now that Foul the Despiser held the Illearth Stone, ancient source of evil power, High Lord Elena turned in de

The Council of Lords found their spells useless, now that Foul the Despiser held the Illearth Stone, ancient source of evil power, High Lord Elena turned in desperation to Covenant and the legendary white hold magic of his ring. And nobody knew how to use the white hold–least of all, Thomas Covenant.

Thus continues one of the most remarkable epic fantasies ever written…
…more


The Book in English!


Download The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson free eBook pdf mobi epub mp3 fb2 CD txt doc kindle Ibook iOS:


The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson (0.00 USD)


Download The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson eBook Free:

MIRROR-2

The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson.pdf (USD-0.00)
The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson.epub (USD-0.00)
The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson.doc (USD-0.00)
The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson.txt (USD-0.00)
The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson.mobi (USD-0.00)


Join hundreds of thousands of satisfied members who previously spent countless hours searching for media and content online, now enjoying the hottestnew games, music, books, movies & software on our site.
It’s here and it’s free. Here’s why you should join:


  • Unlimited books, magazines and comics, wherever you go: directly in your browser on your computer or tablet.
  • More than 10 million titles spanning every genre imaginable, at your fingertips.
  • Get the best books, magazines and comics in all genres, including action, adventure, anime, manga, children and family, classic, , Horror, Music, Romance, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Sport and more.
  • New titles are added every day! We want to keep things new.
  • All platforms. Fully optimized
  • Find out why thousands of people go every day.Sign up and enjoy your entertainment, unlimited!


    TAGS:
    Online The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson eBook, Book The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson FB2, download The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson PDF , Download The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson MOBI, Online The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson eBook, free download The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson IPhone, Online ebook The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson PDF, Free The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson DJVU, Free download The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson TXT, Download The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson RTF, Online The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson FB2 , eBook The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson download TXT, Free The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson download eBook, Book The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson download MOBI, download The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson IPad, read The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson MOBI, Read online The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson DOC, Free The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson AWZ, Download eBook The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson iPad , Free The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson DJVU, Download The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson eBook free, Free download The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson DVD, Read online The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson TXT, Book The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson download DJVU, The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson download book free, The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson download book pdf free, The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson pdf book download free, Download eBook The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson pdf free, The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson download free epup, The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson ePub book download free, download eBook The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson, The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson download free pdf, The Illearth War by Stephen R. Donaldson download eBooks free.

    Bradley

    Jan 22, 2016

    rated it
    liked it

    Shelves:
    fantasy,
    2016-shelf

    I find myself in the unenviable position of rooting for Lord Foul Bane and his many loathsome minions. Maybe it’s just the intentional feature of making all the good guys so perfectly good and forgiving and nonviolent and understanding, but Thomas Covenant DOES NOT DESERVE IT.

    Therefore, I really want to see Lord Foul Bane corrupt every single one of those bastards solely for the purpose of rising up and smiting that worthless son of a bitch, the Ur-Lord Thomas Covenant.

    If it wasn’t crazy enough

    Therefore, I really want to see Lord Foul Bane corrupt every single one of those bastards solely for the purpose of rising up and smiting that worthless son of a bitch, the Ur-Lord Thomas Covenant.

    If it wasn’t crazy enough that the Rape-Child of TC loves her Rape-Father so much that she summons him from our world to save their cut-out-heaven, she thinks she’s in love with him and throws herself at him.

    Yes, she’s his daughter.

    Not only does every character in the Land have no more dimensionality than a piece of toilet paper, but their insane levels of acceptance, even when a rage-filled father goes after TC or when the only true hero of the tale attempts to smite TC across his head, no one gets his just deserts. The grand heroic general who deserves every accolade gets transformed into a tree, and this is despite the fact that he was summoned from the our world, just like TC. He was also the most interesting character of the bunch.

    So what was actually good about this book?

    Well, the battles and battles and endless battles and strategy wasn’t as bad as I’ve read elsewhere, but it isn’t my cup of tea. It reminded me of the bad old days of WoT books 7 and 8, or perhaps a bit worse, because I cared less for the Land or its characters.

    Some of the fantasy elements were pretty good, though, and what’s not to love about bone melding and turning a combatant’s bones to ash, letting the meat sack tumble to the ground? I got into this book only late, and completely to spite TC. Good thing most of the novel didn’t have TC in it, or I might have gotten through an entire season of a TV show I’m way far behind on instead of just half of it, all in a desperate attempt to alleviate the boredom I felt while reading this godforsaken novel.

    I can understand why people might revere this, considering the amount and kinds of fantasy trash that might have been out and about at the time it was written. I understand why it changed the face of old fantasy, just as I understand the Mallorean books did the same.

    But the fact is, they all lack the gritty realism and complexly developed characters that I have come to revere in modern fantasy, and I just can’t get behind it.

    Having far off pining and far off horrors and far off hopes and plans is just BORING as hell to me, and if it can’t be shored up by characters that learn and develop and change when faced with singular events that OUGHT to change them, then all we’ve got is a spoiled asshole who’s turned a veritable heaven into an ongoing hell and he actually BELONGS on the side of Lord Foul Bane and he always will. The fact that he was summoned by LFB’s minion in the first place should be a dead giveaway, but what the hell do I know?

    It’s not like Lord Wonderful Kevin (Don’t get me started with the silliness of that name, the wonderful ancient godlike hero and destroyer of the Land) had anything to do with TC’s summoning, like everyone thought. It looks like everyone has been fooled, and fooled good. Maybe I’m right about TC’s direction. I don’t know. I’m going to have to summon superhuman stores of patience to pick up the third book to find out.
    …more

    Brian

    May 25, 2014

    rated it
    really liked it

    To all those who hated Lord Foul’s Bane — hark! and be redeemed. Thomas Covenant gets yanked back into the Land, where 40 years have passed for its people, but only days for him. In his absence, Foul has amassed an immense army and is preparing to march. The Lords have learned virtually nothing new to aid them in their own defense. And Covenant, who still believes he’s dreaming, finds himself lusted after by the daughter of the woman he previously raped. That is, by his own daughter. Salvation

    Huh? Where did I lose you?

    No matter. The Illearth War is a terrific follow up to the first book in the trilogy, still with one of the great tragic heroes in the genre.

    This book introduces something — and someone — new. Hile Troy, the new leader of the Lords’ army, is a man who claims to be from Covenant’s world. I say “claims to be” because Covenant believes he made him up, but the second part of the book is told from Troy’s point of view, and tells of things of which Covenant has no knowledge. So we know what Covenant does not: the Land is real.

    Troy accepts the Land, blesses it (for he was born without eyes, but now can see), and does everything he can to help the Lords defeat Foul. He is, I suppose, something of the sort of hero that many readers had hoped Covenant would be. And he shares their disdain: he neither understands Covenant’s unbelief nor sympathizes with him in any way. But, again, we know something he does not: for all his military strategizing, he is not a rational man. He loves the Land because it loves him back. It’s just the sort of alluring yet pathetic logic that Covenant fears as a pathway to despair and madness.

    After the introductions of the first part, the book is split between Troy’s war with Foul’s army and the quest for one of the hidden wards of knowledge and power that the Lords believe can help turn the tide of battle in their favor. Covenant accompanies his daughter on the quest for the ward.

    This line of the plot — Covenant and his daughter — was a stroke of macabre genius, wickedly encapsulating the central contradiction of Covenant’s predicament, his desire to embrace the Land and his need to repudiate it. His solution, however, will appeal only to those who sympathize with his plight, for it leads him to do something that, if taken at face value, is even worse than rape.

    No, this book isn’t going to make converts of those who disliked the first. But for the rest of us, those of us who don’t have it all figured out, it is another intimately compelling portrait of the tortuous struggle with the ideas and beliefs that define us, in a world that tells us every day in so many ways that we are wrong.

    Post Script: In all the negative reviews of this book that I’ve read, the following quotation is probably the funniest and yet the most telling:

    “He’s still a leper, and it still isn’t very important to this book.” – Marianne
    …more

    Wanda

    “Thomas Covenant found himself once again summoned to the Land. The Council of Lords needed him to move against Foul the Despiser who held the Illearth Stone, ancient source of evil power. But although Thomas Covenant held the legendary ring, he didn’t know how to use its strength, and risked losing everything….”

    I’ll admit that book 2 is an improvement over book 1, but it’s a grudging admission. Having said that, Thomas Covenant is STILL an ass, but the improvement is that this installment isn

    I’ll admit that book 2 is an improvement over book 1, but it’s a grudging admission. Having said that, Thomas Covenant is STILL an ass, but the improvement is that this installment isn’t all in Covenant’s POV. Mind you, Hile Troy as narrator is only a small step upwards. What is it with the Lords’ magic that they can only seem to snag “damaged” men from “our” world? At least Troy had some theoretical battle knowledge to contribute [but he would probably be much better at mission planning if he was less emotionally involved, à la Ender’s Game].

    I hate that there are lots of female characters and all of them are cardboard cutouts (mind you, even the vast majority of the male characters are extremely under-developed, so I guess I shouldn’t bitch too much). High Lord Elena wastes time “massaging the brows” of upset men, instead of giving them a swift kick and telling them to get over themselves. Especially since Covenant and Troy both really need to get over themselves. Plus if a male High Lord spent time cooking and cleaning up along the journey, we’d wonder what the heck was wrong with him—where is his support staff? Elena’s willingness to just go haring off after the Seventh Ward right before battle just baffled me—once again, behaviour which wouldn’t be acceptable in a male character in her position and I didn’t find acceptable for her either.

    Pacing was a big issue for me in this book. This tale just whips you onward, giving no respite, no hint that there is hope with which to buoy your spirit as the battle unfolds. I kept waiting for a switch, for a chapter to describe what Elena and Covenant were doing, for example. Instead, I was getting beaten down, as the army keeps on making heroic sacrifices and nothing is gained, they just face another retreat when they are already completely worn down and worn out. Even a glimpse behind enemy lines would have be an improvement, just to tear the gaze away from the grind of marching and making a series of “last stands.” Eventually, we get Covenant’s perspective, but I would have preferred some kind of alternation between the two, rather than just doggedly following one plot line to the end before starting in on the second plot line. And we never get a glimpse into the enemy camp, to know what the good guys are up against.

    My biggest beef, I think, is that the people don’t act like any real people that I know. The people of The Land are sheep-like in accepting that Covenant’s ring accords him special treatment and in placing their faith in him and in Troy without any suspicion or any real discussion. There seems to be blind faith in their leadership by the council of Lords. The only emotions expressed by any characters are those of anger and unhappiness—if you don’t count unbelievable insta-love (which I don’t because it doesn’t exist). [And women falling in love with their fathers—like that’s going to happen except in Sigmund Freud’s wild imagination.]

    2.5 stars, and that’s being generous.

    …more