The Queen’s Poisoner (Kingfountain, #1) by Jeff Wheeler Download (read online) free eBook .pdf.epub.kindle

The Queen's Poisoner (Kingfountain, #1)

King Severn Argentine’s fearsome reputation precedes him: usurper of the throne, killer of rightful heirs, ruthless punisher of traitors. Attempting to depose him, the Duke of Kiskaddon gambles…and loses. Now the duke must atone by handing over his young son, Owen, as the king’s hostage. And should his loyalty falter again, the boy will pay with his life.

Seeking allies and

Seeking allies and eluding Severn’s spies, Owen learns to survive in the court of Kingfountain. But when new evidence of his father’s betrayal threatens to seal his fate, Owen must win the vengeful king’s favor by proving his worth—through extraordinary means. And only one person can aid his desperate cause: a mysterious woman, dwelling in secrecy, who truly wields power over life, death, and destiny.
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    Melissa ♥ Dog Lover ♥ Martin

    7-3-17 This book and the next two or three are $1.99 on Audible for the US right now. I’m not sure about anywhere else.

    MY BLOG: Melissa Martin’s Reading List

    I got this book free through the kindle first program. I’m doing pretty good at picking winners!

    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/da/e1/3c/dae13c1fcd8509dc59ca27731d7f11de.jpg

    Damn book made me cry, a good cry and sad cry!

     :

    Lord Kiskaddon made a mistake when he didn’t abide by the King’s wishes and he lost his eldest son and had to give over another one of his children as a ward. Lady Eleanor and Lord Kiskaddon decided

    MY BLOG: Melissa Martin’s Reading List

    I got this book free through the kindle first program. I’m doing pretty good at picking winners!

    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/da/e1/3c/dae13c1fcd8509dc59ca27731d7f11de.jpg

    Damn book made me cry, a good cry and sad cry!

     :

    Lord Kiskaddon made a mistake when he didn’t abide by the King’s wishes and he lost his eldest son and had to give over another one of his children as a ward. Lady Eleanor and Lord Kiskaddon decided to send Owen, they had to do this or their whole family would be killed.

    Owen is only eight-years-old and he is terrified to say the least. He’s so afraid of being away from his family and that he is going to be killed by the King. He finds solace in the kitchen playing with tiles, which seems to be a form of dominoes, and staying out of the way.

    Owen makes some friends and enemies in the castle. One of these friends is Ankaretta who is the Queen’s Poisoner, she is said to have been killed years ago but alas, she is not dead. She lives in the castle right under their noses. That is the only spoiler I’m giving out about her but lets just say she is so smart and so nice and being a poisoner is not the only thing she is. She starts to train Owen in things he needs to do to win over the King and it’s not what you may think.

    At one point, one of the king’s men brings his granddaughter to be friends with Owen. He is terrified of her at first and wants to run for the hills, she talks up a storm and is scared of nothing. They end up forming a wonderful bond and he can share secrets with Evie and trust her with his life and vise versa. They are such good characters and they made me laugh out loud a few times at their antics.

    There is magic in the book as well. There is always magic right?

    There are also people in the book that are Fountain-blessed. I’m not going to tell you what that means because you need to read if for yourself. It’s really awesome though!

     :

    If your thinking this is some high action book.. it is not. The book is about Owen and what all he has to do to try to save his family and figure out his life plan. We find out some things in the book that are not all they seem. The book is just so good, even though I thought it was going to be about something totally different, I loved it just the same. I look forward to more books in the series or trilogy.
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    Katie B (Bisforbookiemonster)

    I’m totally going against the majority of the ratings here, but this book has left me with mixed feelings. I like the premise, a lot, which is the reason that I chose it as my pick for March’s Kindle First. I like the idea of a trilogy where each book focuses on the main character at a different time in his life. Add to that the concept of magic, and I was intrigued.

    But that’s really where the intrigue ended.

    I’d like to say that this book involves a sly power play for the throne or the tricks an

    But that’s really where the intrigue ended.

    I’d like to say that this book involves a sly power play for the throne or the tricks and secrets that make up court politics, but it doesn’t. At all.

    In fact, if you asked me what the plot of this novel is, I wouldn’t be able to tell you. The few events that do happen just don’t seem big enough to actually carry the novel. Yes, Owen gets taken in as the King’s hostage, and yes, he finds a woman who helps him to “survive.” But the thing is, I never got the feeling while reading this that he was in all that much danger. I never felt the fear.

    And without the element of real danger, I couldn’t get into the novel like I wanted to. I felt like I was looking in from the outside the entire time, not like I was in it. The whole plot centers on making sure Owen is indispensable to the king. Maybe I’m a picky reader, but that isn’t enough for me.

    Jeff Wheeler clearly put some thought into the building of this world, but I thought his explanations were executed in a simplistic, info-dumping way. Yes, that facilitates fast and mindless reading, but that’s not what I’m looking for when I pick up a fantasy series. The writing style also serves to make certain events more superficial and less emotional then they should be.

    For example, we get the background of Owen’s mother within the first few pages:

    “Her husband had been summoned to join the king’s army on the battlefield to face the invasion, and her oldest son was a hostage in the king’s army to ensure her husband’s good faith.”

    Again, I may be too demanding of a reader, but I want to feel this woman’s pain that her husband and her eldest son are in danger and her worry over not knowing what’s going to happen. Instead I get this one sentence explaining why she’s so nervous. Wheeler seems to have a habit of telling rather than showing, and this happens multiple times throughout the book.

    Then there’s the total condescension of children. Two of the main characters, Owen and Lady Elysabeth Victoria Mortimer, are eight years old. At their first meeting, they talk about the deaths of their family members, and they both are portrayed as not understanding the concept of death. They mention it briefly, express confusion over why people cry when a loved one dies, and then they switch to talking about something else.

    I was actually kind of offended by this lack of empathy. Let me tell you, 8-year-olds are most definitely astute enough to understand death and feel grief.

    Not to mention this absolutely pointless paragraph:

    “The muffin continued to tempt him and he finally succumbed and took a bite. The bread of the muffin was like cake and the seeds crunched a bit when he bit down on them. He had never had this kind before, but it was delicious, and he wolfed it down.”

    Just to put things into context, these are Owen’s thoughts right after he’s been taken from his family and is scared of the new place he’s going to. He’s thinking more about a muffin he’s eating than he is about his family. Wheeler appears to have a misconception of the intellectual and emotional development that occurs in an 8-year-old child, and this is how he believes children really think. When they are in safety and comfort, perhaps. But when they’re surrounded by strangers and heading into danger?

    Definitely not.

    However, I must say that the relationship between Owen and his friend “Evie” is very cute. That is one of the few aspects of these children that actually feels real.

    Moving onto the method in which we learn about this world…

    It is not subtle. At all. Many tidbits of information seem out of place throughout the story. It is as though they were dropped into the dialogue of certain characters solely for the benefit of the reader, which makes some of the conversations feel unnatural and strange. Curious about something? Don’t worry, because one of the adults will definitely randomly decide to tell Owen the story of how that thing came to be. How convenient!

    I also get the impression that no one in this court is actually all that intelligent (except for Ankarette). There are several instances when certain deceits should be exceedingly obvious to a master of spies to the king (he’s a master, for cripes’ sake!), and yet no one sees through those plans.

    This was reoccurring throughout the novel: people and plans that are supposed to be clever aren’t actually all that clever upon closer inspection. (view spoiler)

    But what bothers me the most is the writing style. At times it is so simplistic as to be jolting, and it makes scenes that should be emotional and riveting feel robotic instead:

    “He swallowed some tears before they could spill. His throat was thick and tight. He burrowed himself against her. She felt cold. Her hand limply stroked his hair.”

    Reading that, I felt nothing. And I really should have.

    I had too many problems with this book to truly enjoy it. Between the lack of credit given to a child’s intellectual and emotional capacity, the lack of complexity, and the writing style, any hope I had for the premise was completely stomped into the mud. And yet, inexplicably, I feel a slight tugging to read the sequel.

    I guess we’ll see what happens.

    Final Rating: 2 stars

    …more

    Dannii Elle

    Sep 01, 2016

    rated it
    liked it

    Actual rating 3.5 stars.

    This is the first installment in the Kingfountain trilogy and follows the journey of Owen Kiskaddon, as he is taken from his home to the King’s castle as hostage for his father’s crimes of desertion and treason. Owen, a shy and serious seven-year-old, was easy to fall in love with and I immediately empathized with his plight. His abrupt departure from the world he knew, the chaos of the King’s palace and the new faces he was confronted with, all conspired to give this an

    This is the first installment in the Kingfountain trilogy and follows the journey of Owen Kiskaddon, as he is taken from his home to the King’s castle as hostage for his father’s crimes of desertion and treason. Owen, a shy and serious seven-year-old, was easy to fall in love with and I immediately empathized with his plight. His abrupt departure from the world he knew, the chaos of the King’s palace and the new faces he was confronted with, all conspired to give this an adventurous and action-packed beginning. It wasn’t until over a quarter of the way through that the reader becomes privy to the fact of the king’s magical abilities, aided by the magical fountain water. He is not alone in this aptitude, as Owen soon learns when he meets the mysterious Ankarette Tryneowy, the former Queen’s poisoner.

    Owen’s friendship with Lady Elysabeth Victoria Mortimer made interesting reading, and I adored joining them on their childish and daring adventures. Learning of their quirky ways gave light respite from the surrounding story of political intrigue. ‘Evie’, as Owen affectionatly calls her, was a little doll and I quickly became so in love with her and Owen’s little friendship. They were such an odd duo, which only made them the more interesting to read of.

    Despite my initial affinity with this story, inconsistencies began to arise that marred my overall enjoyment. This read partly like a high fantasy or historical fiction novel, as it was full of court intrigue and political workings, but the young perspective led other parts of this to read more like a middle grade novel. Owen is a child and yet his inner-monologues often do not read as one who is such, leading to some ambiguity to also arise over his character.

    Overall, I liked the book and am excited to see where the story goes, in the next two installments, but I can’t say this is my favourite fantasy story, so far. I think I became more interested in the next episode once I learnt that it is set seven years into the future, and I only hope that the older protagonist will combat my minor dislikes from this book.
    …more