The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen Download (read online) free eBook .pdf.epub.kindle

The Unseen

Nobody can leave an island. An island is a cosmos in a nutshell, where the stars slumber in the grass beneath the snow. But occasionally someone tries . . .

Ingrid Barrøy is born on an island that bears her name – a holdfast for a single family, their livestock, their crops, their hopes and dreams.

Her father dreams of building a quay that will connect them to the mainlan


Nobody can leave an island. An island is a cosmos in a nutshell, where the stars slumber in the grass beneath the snow. But occasionally someone tries . . .

Ingrid Barrøy is born on an island that bears her name – a holdfast for a single family, their livestock, their crops, their hopes and dreams.

Her father dreams of building a quay that will connect them to the mainland, but closer ties to the wider world come at a price. Her mother has her own dreams – more children, a smaller island, a different life – and there is one question Ingrid must never ask her.

Island life is hard, a living scratched from the dirt or trawled from the sea, so when Ingrid comes of age, she is sent to the mainland to work for one of the wealthy families on the coast.

But Norway too is waking up to a wider world, a modern world that is capricious and can be cruel. Tragedy strikes, and Ingrid must fight to protect the home she thought she had left behind.


…more


The Book in English!


Download The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen free eBook pdf mobi epub mp3 fb2 CD txt doc kindle Ibook iOS:


The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen (0.00 USD)


Download The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen eBook Free:

MIRROR-2

The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen.pdf (USD-0.00)
The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen.epub (USD-0.00)
The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen.doc (USD-0.00)
The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen.txt (USD-0.00)
The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen.mobi (USD-0.00)


Join hundreds of thousands of satisfied members who previously spent countless hours searching for media and content online, now enjoying the hottestnew games, music, books, movies & software on our site.
It’s here and it’s free. Here’s why you should join:


  • Unlimited books, magazines and comics, wherever you go: directly in your browser on your computer or tablet.
  • More than 10 million titles spanning every genre imaginable, at your fingertips.
  • Get the best books, magazines and comics in all genres, including action, adventure, anime, manga, children and family, classic, , Horror, Music, Romance, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Sport and more.
  • New titles are added every day! We want to keep things new.
  • All platforms. Fully optimized
  • Find out why thousands of people go every day.Sign up and enjoy your entertainment, unlimited!


    TAGS:
    Online The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen eBook, Book The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen FB2, download The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen PDF , Download The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen MOBI, Online The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen eBook, free download The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen IPhone, Online ebook The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen PDF, Free The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen DJVU, Free download The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen TXT, Download The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen RTF, Online The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen FB2 , eBook The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen download TXT, Free The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen download eBook, Book The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen download MOBI, download The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen IPad, read The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen MOBI, Read online The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen DOC, Free The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen AWZ, Download eBook The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen iPad , Free The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen DJVU, Download The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen eBook free, Free download The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen DVD, Read online The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen TXT, Book The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen download DJVU, The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen download book free, The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen download book pdf free, The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen pdf book download free, Download eBook The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen pdf free, The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen download free epup, The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen ePub book download free, download eBook The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen, The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen download free pdf, The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen download eBooks free.

    Adina

    Jun 07, 2017

    rated it
    it was amazing

    2/6 from Booker International Prize Shortlist. 4.5*

    My heart fills with love while I sit on my chair thinking how to review The Unseen. Its “quiet beauty” (a perfect description of this book read in Jill’s review) enveloped me and concurred my soul without me even noticing.

    It is almost impossible for me to explain why I loved this small novel so much, since at a first glance it contains some elements that I run away from: long descriptive passages and recount of life at sea. I will try, though,

    My heart fills with love while I sit on my chair thinking how to review The Unseen. Its “quiet beauty” (a perfect description of this book read in Jill’s review) enveloped me and concurred my soul without me even noticing.

    It is almost impossible for me to explain why I loved this small novel so much, since at a first glance it contains some elements that I run away from: long descriptive passages and recount of life at sea. I will try, though, with some images, my humble words and with the help of the author’s, to introduce you to life on a small island in Norway.

    The Unseen captures the day to day life of the Barrøy family on a small, one family island on the Norwegian coast, probably at the beginning of the 20th century. The novel starts with only 5 people living on the island: Hans, Maria – his wife, the daughter Ingrid, Martin – Hans’ father and Barbo- Hans’ sisters.

    The island, “is a little under one kilometre from north to south, and half a kilometre from east to west, it has lots of crags and small grassy hollows and sells, deep coves cut into its coast and there are long rugged headlands and three white beaches. And even though on a normal day they can stand in the yard and keep an eye on the sheep, they are not so easy to spot when they are lying down in the long grass, the same goes for people, even an island has its secrets.”

    description

    Life is hard on the island and there is a permanent struggle to survive and to construct a more comfortable existence. Hans has to go to Lofoten each winter with a fishing boat from where he receives half of the catch proceeds. This represents a major part of the family’s income completed by the sale of fish caught around the island, of seagull eggs ( I had no idea they were edible) and milk from their livestock.

    description

    Winters are especially hard in such a remote place. The family is forced to battle the harsh forces of nature and most of the time they are at their mercy. “Winter begins with a storm. They call it the First Winter Storm. There have been earlier storms, in August and September, for example, bringing sudden and merciless changes to their lives.

    The First Winter Storm, on the other hand, is quite a different matter. It is violent every single time and makes its entrance with a vengeance, they have never experienced anything like it, even though it happened last year. This is the origin of the phrase “in living memory”, they have simply forgotten how it was, since they have no choice but to ride the storm, the hell on earth, as best they can, and erase it from their memories as soon as possible. “

    description

    The family seems to be bound to live on the island. “once you settle on an island, you never leave, an island holds on to what it has with all its might and main.” Barbro and Ingrid tried, in turn, to leave to work as maids on the mainland but the island always called them back, sooner or later, by choice or by tragedy.

    description

    The Unseen has a slow moving plot but I did not feel it as a slow read. This would be my choice to win the MBI prize but, in the same time, I can see why it would not be a favorite. The book might be too quiet; there isn’t too much of a dramatic atmosphere even when tragedy strikes.

    There is only one thing that made my reading experience less pleasurable. The English dialect invented for the translation of the dialogue between the islanders is a bit strange and forced. However, I understand that the author is very difficult to translate and a hard decision had to be made on how to deal with the Norwegian dialect. Excepting the dialogue, the translator made a wonderful job, his previous experience with Min Kamp and Jo Nesbo’s novels definitely helped.

    description

    Many thanks to Roy Jacobsen, Quercus Books, and Netgalley for this copy in exchange for an honest review.
    …more

    Peter Boyle

    Jun 11, 2017

    rated it
    really liked it

     · 
    review of another edition

    “Islanders are never afraid, if they were they wouldn’t be able to live here…”

    This captivating tale is set on the tiny island of Barrøy off the coast of Norway, around the beginning of the 20th century. It is inhabited by one family: Hans, his wife Maria, father Martin, sister Barbro and his young daughter Ingrid. The story tracks the adventures of this clan through the years, as they struggle to make a living from their small provisions by way of fishing and farming. There are unexpected birt

    This captivating tale is set on the tiny island of Barrøy off the coast of Norway, around the beginning of the 20th century. It is inhabited by one family: Hans, his wife Maria, father Martin, sister Barbro and his young daughter Ingrid. The story tracks the adventures of this clan through the years, as they struggle to make a living from their small provisions by way of fishing and farming. There are unexpected births and deaths along the way, and we follow Ingrid’s journey from little girl to eventual Queen of the island.

    What struck me about the plight of the Barrøys is how the island shapes their whole existence. It is their livelihood but it’s also a kind of prison. Life unfurls at a different pace to that of the mainland. The family exist at the mercy of the weather – glorious summers are always welcome but they also have to contend with the howling gales and tempestuous seas of winter:

    “She doesn’t like these storms, the creaking of the house and the trumpet blasts from the chimney, the whole universe in turmoil, the wind that tears the breath out of her lungs when she goes to the barn with her mother, that drives the moisture from her eyes and sweeps her into walls and bowed trees, and forces the entire family to camp down in the kitchen and sitting room, and even there they don’t get a wink of sleep.”

    Even though Barrøy marches to the beat of its own drum, there is also pressure on the family to adapt if they want a better life for themselves. Hans is an ambitious man but he is also a bit of a dreamer. He has big plans to build a boatshed and a quay, and to add an extension to the house. Some of these ideas come to fruition, others fail. External change also threatens to upset the delicate balance of the island, with important decisions to be made about joining a milk route and the construction of a lighthouse beacon. The outside world is developing at a rapid pace and Barrøy cannot afford to be left too far behind.

    The Unseen reminded me a little of A Whole Life, another wise European novel about man’s relationship to a landscape. Like the main character of that book, the Barrøys face up to all kinds of emotional and financial hardship with fortitude. The are no major pyrotechnics in the plot: just one family doing the best they can. The prose is clear and sparse – very matter-of-fact, just like the Barrøys themselves. But it is also sprinkled with moments of sheer beauty, like a frozen sea that serves as the perfect ice rink or the moment Ingrid catches her reflection in a mirror for the first time. It is a compelling and convincing portrait of a lost age, a profound and moving story.
    …more

    Paul Fulcher

    Mar 24, 2017

    rated it
    really liked it

     · 
    review of another edition

    Winter begins with a storm. They call it the First Winter Storm. There have been earlier storms, in August and September, for example, bringing sudden and merciless changes to their lives.

    The First Winter Storm, on the other hand, is quite a different matter.

    It is violent every single time and makes its entrance with a vengeance, they have never experienced anything like it, even though it happened last year. This is the origin of the phrase “in living memory”, they have simply forgotten how it

    The First Winter Storm, on the other hand, is quite a different matter.

    It is violent every single time and makes its entrance with a vengeance, they have never experienced anything like it, even though it happened last year. This is the origin of the phrase “in living memory”, they have simply forgotten how it was, since they have no choice but to ride the storm, the hell on earth, as best they can, and erase it from their memories as soon as possible.
    [..]
    The sight of her father is the worst. Had Ingrid not known better she would have thought he was afraid, and he never is. Islanders are never afraid, if they were they wouldn’t be able to live here, they would have to pack their goods and chattels and move and be like everyone else in the forest and valleys, it would be a catastrophe, islanders have a dark disposition, they are beset not with fear but solemnity.

    The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen is set in the first half of the 20th Century (although there is little to date the novel), on the fictional Barrøy island off the coast of Norway in the Helgelandskysten area.

    It is a little under one kilometre from north to south, and half a kilometre from east to west, it has lots of crags and small grassy hollows and sells, deep coves cut into its coast and there are long rugged headlands and three white beaches. And even though on a normal day they can stand in the yard and keep an eye on the sheep, they are not so easy to spot when they are lying down in he long grass, the same goes for people, even an island has its secrets.

    The fisherman-cum-farmer Hans Barrøy [is] the island’s rightful owner and head of its sole family, comprising his strong-willed wife Maria, born on a neighbouring island, Hans’s widowed father Martin, no longer head of the family which he represents, his much younger sister Barbro, a hard worker but rather backwards, and his young daughter Ingrid, three when the novel opens but already troubling her father with wisdom beyond her years, and who he anxiously watches for signs of the one-child-in-a-generation affliction from which he aunt suffers:

    “Tha laughs at ev’rythin’ nu,” he says, reflecting that she knows the difference between play and earnest, she seldom cries, doesn’t disobey or show defiance, is never ill, and she learns what she needs to, this disquiet he will have to drive from his mind.

    Life on the island is elemental and hard. Hans has to leave his family for several months each year to join a fishing boat, in which he proudly has a full share of the proceeds, as well as (unbeknowest) to his family drawing on bank loans, in order to finance the costs of maintaining the island and, in particular, his own ambitious plans to extend their house and build a proper pier. Much of the building material still comes from flotsam, jetsam and driftwood: Whatever is washed up on an island belongs to the finder and the islanders find a lot. In those days there was no oil-wealth funded Nordic model providing support to the islanders:

    As the terrain is so open and exposed someone might well up with the bright idea of clothing the coast in evergreen, spruce or pines for example, and establish idealistic nurseries around Norway and start to ship out large quantities of tiny spruce trees, donating them free of charge to the inhabitants of smaller and bigger islands alike, while telling them that if you plant these trees on your land and let them grow, succeeding generations will have fuel and timber too. The wind will stop blowing the soil into the sea, and both man and beast will enjoy shelter and peace where hitherto they had the wind in their hair day and night; but then the islands would no longer look like floating temples on the horizon, they would resemble neglected wastelands of sedge grass and northern dock. No, no one would think of doing this, of destroying a horizon. The horizon is probably the most important resource they have out here, the quivering optic nerve in a dream although they barely notice it, let alone attempt to articulate its significance. No, nobody would even consider doing this until the country attains such wealth that it is in the process of going to wrack and ruin.

    Hans expects to live out his life on the island but Barbro wants to find a role in service on the mainland. Nobody can leave an island. An island is a cosmos in a nutshell, where the stars slumber in the grass beneath the snow. But occasionally someone tries. (in the original: Ingen kan forlade en ø, en ø er et kosmos i en nøddeskal med stjernerne sovende i græsset under sneen.”)

    Concerned at her being mistreated and abused – her first putative employer manages to refer to her as “the imbecile” three times as she shows them the room Hans’s sister is to share with the other maid – Hans keeps insisting Barbro returns to the island until she takes matters, and the oars of the family boat, into her own hands, but even then she eventually finds her way back.

    Hans Barrøy had three dreams: he dreamed about a boat with a motor, about a bigger island and a different life. He mentioned the first two dreams readily and often, and to all and sundry, the last he never talked about, not even to himself.

    Maria had three dreams too: more children, a smaller island and – a different life. Unlike her husband she often thought about the last of these, and her yearning grew and grew as the first two paled and withered.

    But it is Ingrid, still biologically a child, who, as the seasons turn and the cycle of life progresses, has to take on the island and their dreams.

    The novel has been translated by the deservedly renowed Don Bartlett, translator of the excellent Karl Ove Knausgård, Per Petterson and Lars Saabye Christensen as well as the best-selling Jo Nesbø and Jostein Gaarder. Although this, as well as Jacobsen’s previous novels and novels by Erlend Loe, has been co-translated by Don Shaw.

    The translation generally lives up to Bartlett’s very high standards, although the attempt to render the dialect of the locals into English fell a little flat for me, with lines such as

    “My word, hvur bitty it is. A can scarce see th’ houses”
    and
    “By Jove, A can see th’ rectory too”

    Norwegian literature is perhaps my favourite in Europe – with authors such as Dag Solstad and Jan Kjærstad, as well of course as Hamsun, to add to the aforementioned Karl Ove Knausgård, Per Petterson and Lars Saabye Christensen – and this novel adds another name to that impressive list.

    I would hope to see this on the MBI shortlist.

    It is always the person who has been away who gains the greatest pleasure from knowing time stands still.
    …more