The X-Files: Cold Cases by Joe Harris Download (read online) free eBook .pdf.epub.kindle

The X-Files: Cold Cases

The series that had a generation looking to the sky gets a breathtaking audio reprise in an original full-cast dramatization featuring actors David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson returning to voice FBI agents Fox Mulder and Dana Scully.
Based upon the graphic novels by Joe Harris – with creative direction from series creator Chris Carter – and adapted specifically for the au


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    Joseph

    Jul 23, 2017

    rated it
    liked it

    Shelves:
    science-fiction

    I want to Believelike it.

    First, it was really great to hear all the old voices including characters who “died” in the series.

    Second, It was more of a radio show than a book, which is still alright.

    Third, it seems that switching to audio only left the writing wanting for more. The only narration is at the beginning of each chapter — Date, time, and place. What would have been easily done by a narrator is done by thinking out loud by the characters or “Remember that time…” stories. At times it

    First, it was really great to hear all the old voices including characters who “died” in the series.

    Second, It was more of a radio show than a book, which is still alright.

    Third, it seems that switching to audio only left the writing wanting for more. The only narration is at the beginning of each chapter — Date, time, and place. What would have been easily done by a narrator is done by thinking out loud by the characters or “Remember that time…” stories. At times it is pretty painful to listen to.

    Fourth, I did like the completion of the Fluke-man story. Other stories could have been better but left me feeling like I was watching a tv show without any picture. There was not enough narration or enough material for the imagination to grow on to complete the picture.

    I hope if there is a next time it will be a un abridged novel being read with a narrator. there have been some well written X-Files novels that would have benefited from this type of treatment.

    I still want to believe
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    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    Jul 30, 2017

    rated it
    really liked it

    Shelves:
    audio-drama

    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2017/08/06/…

    While I have been listening to audiobooks for years, this is the first time I’ve actually tried one of these much-talked-about audio dramas from Audible Studios. Also known as audio plays or audio theater, these are very much like the old-school radio shows that were so popular in the 1920s-40s before the advent of television, though obviously their successors have come a long way since those days. Still, the idea is the s

    While I have been listening to audiobooks for years, this is the first time I’ve actually tried one of these much-talked-about audio dramas from Audible Studios. Also known as audio plays or audio theater, these are very much like the old-school radio shows that were so popular in the 1920s-40s before the advent of television, though obviously their successors have come a long way since those days. Still, the idea is the same—with no visual aspect at all, the production relies completely on dialogue, music, and sound effects to tell the story.

    As this was brand new territory for me, I was happy to take my first plunge with a franchise that has always been close to my heart. The X-Files dominated my TV time in the 90s and was a show that made a huge impression on my childhood, so despite the disastrous final seasons, the terrible movies, and the most recent lukewarm miniseries revival, I always still find myself returning again and again. The X-Files: Cold Cases caught my eye right away for several reasons, and not least because it features a full cast including David Duchovny, Gillian Anderson, and several other actors from the original show returning to voice their respective characters. I was also intrigued because this audio drama is actually an adaption of the series of graphic novels by Joe Harris, and I’ve always been curious about those.

    Set after the events of The X-Files: I Want to Believe, these stories provide a glimpse into those intervening years leading up to 2016’s television tenth season. When a cyber security breach at FBI headquarters compromises the information of unsolved investigations, former agents Mulder and Scully are pulled out of hiding by Deputy Director Skinner to resume their past work in the secret department known as the X-Files. For Scully, the timing of the database breach is of an even greater concern when she learns that some of the stolen information may involve the child she secretly put up for adoption, and now the boy may be in danger.

    So, the nostalgia is there, but is it enough? The answer, I think, will depend on what you were expecting. I wouldn’t consider myself a super fan by any means, but I’ll admit my heart still gave an excited flutter to think about Mulder and Scully being on the case again, going back and forth with their cheeky banter. It’s less about the stories for me, but more about the full experience. Even audio dramas such as these are an opportunity for me to skip down memory lane in the hopes of recapturing and holding on to that old feeling, so yes—personally speaking, anyway—sometimes nostalgia is indeed enough. Even hearing that familiar Mark Snow theme song come through my headphones in the audiobook intro was enough to send a pleasant shiver down my spine.

    That said though, not all the stories in here were created equal. Like the first volume of the graphic novel it was based on, this audio drama contains a handful of episodes over a period of about four hours. The first story, ostensibly reintroducing Mulder and Scully back into game while also attempting to link this series to the main body of the lore was, in a nutshell, awkward as hell. Just as well that I wasn’t really looking for story cogency, because there was some major plot gymnastics going down in this first episode in order to tie the X-Files mythology together with the goal of bringing back as many old characters as possible. Calling it messy would be an understatement, but thankfully, not all the episodes were like this. Subsequent stories, particularly the ones that moved away from “mytharc” themes to instead feature more “monster of the week” horror/thriller narratives were a lot more entertaining and easier to follow. I especially enjoyed the return to Flukeman as well as the episode that took our characters on a trip to investigate a case in Saudi Arabia.

    As far as my first experience with an audio drama went, I loved it! The performances were amazing, with Duchovny and Anderson bringing their best even when the acting only involved voice work. The characters were true to themselves, and many times I caught myself smiling as I pictured Mulder’s deadpan deliveries or Scully’s epic eye-rolls. The music and sound effects were also mixed in so perfectly that if I closed my eyes I could almost imagine seeing everything play out like it was a TV episode. That’s not to say everything was flawless, because whenever you deal with adaptations, especially from a visual medium to an aural one, it’s inevitable that you’ll encounter some hitches. You’ll get the odd scene where the actor has to talk clumsily to themselves to make up for the listener not being able to see what’s going on (“I’m wearing the same clothes, and here’s the same bullet hole in my jacket….but oh, my arm! There’s not a scratch!”) but on the whole, I think the creative team did a really good job adapting the comic in spite of the limitations.

    In sum, I had a great time with this audio drama and would do this again in a heartbeat. While this wouldn’t be the best place to start your journey if you’re new to the X-Files franchise (mainly because there’s so much of the original show’s mythology involved), I definitely would not hesitate to recommend these audiobooks to fans like me who aren’t quite ready to let go of the magic just yet. I still want to believe! Needless to say, I’m already highly anticipating the next audio drama in this series, The X-Files: Stolen Lives.
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    Dinara Tengri

    How long have I been waiting for this! How many times have I checked my calendar, counting the days before I could download this audiobook to my tablet! But it’s finally here, and last Tuesday, I sat down, and I listened to the whole thing in one sitting. I just gobbled down this audiobook like it was a bowl of chocolate chip ice cream, with whipped cream and strawberries on top.

    The X-files: Cold Cases is an audiodrama that is based on X-Files: Season 10 – a series of comic books that were writt

    The X-files: Cold Cases is an audiodrama that is based on X-Files: Season 10 – a series of comic books that were written by author Joe Harris, under the creative supervision of the series creator Chris Carter. It stars most of the original cast, including the actors playing the Lone Gunmen.

    WARNING: Some spoilers for pretty much the whole show, and the feature film, I Want to Believe.

    In Cold Cases, we meet Dana Scully and Fox Mulder living and working under fake names, as they are still hiding from their enemies, presumably after the events of season nine finale. The two of them are pulled back into the limelight, however, after a cyberattack on the FBI database. It seems that whoever was responsible for the attack was targeting FBI agents that were connected to the X-files, an infamous project outside of the FBI mainstream. Soon after the attack, Scully is abducted by a mysterious group of shapeshifters that call themselves the Acolytes, and Mulder gets a visit from an old foe, who was thought dead.

    There have been so many reincarnations and adaptations of this cult classic TV-show. We’re talking about books, novelisations, comics books, games, and movies. But this is the first time that The X-Files has been adapted into audiodrama, and I was both excited and nervous to see how it would work out. There are elements of these stories that are dependent on the visual medium, like the special effects, and those small, quiet moments between Scully and Mulder that can only be shown on-screen. So it was interesting to see how The X-Files would fit in this format.

    This turned out to be an amazing audiodrama that exceeded my expectations, and left me craving more. Four hours is just not enough, damn it! What is it with the new X-Files seasons being so short?

    This audioplay is a non-stop, four-hour thrill ride. It’s fast-paced, and there’s never a dull moment between all the action. The story is thrilling and unpredictable. It’s dark, violent, and scary. But it’s also chock-full of the dry, deadpan humour that the show has always been known for.

    The performances from the original cast are excellent. You don’t get a feeling that these are just actors reading lines into a microphone; they’re all giving one hundred percent in their performances, just as they would if this was another season of the show. I would say that the star here is David Duchovny. You can hear that he’s having fun playing Mulder again.

    Even Gillian Anderson, I feel, has more energy here than she did in season ten. She brought back that witty, and cocky Scully we remember from the earlier seasons. Mitch Pileggi as Deputy Director Skinner, and William B. Davis as Cancerman are great as well, and it was so great hearing their voices again. Dean Haglund, Tom Braidwood, and Bruce Harwood are hilarious and adorable as The Lone Gunmen, although Frohike’s creep factor has been dialed-up for some reason.

    As for the rest of the cast, most of them are doing a very good job. Their performances are emotional and life-like. There are. however, some rough patches. For instance, the Russian and the Arabic accents are laughable. They’re so cartoony the aren’t even offensive. But the most disappointing part is that neither Robert Patrick nor Nicholas Lea came to reprise their roles as John Doggett, and Alex Krycek respectively. The actors who got to portray these characters are good, it’s just that both Patrick and Lea have very distinct voices, and hearing someone else voice their characters is just not the same. I can never buy anyone other than Nicholas Lea being pummelled by David Duchovny.

    Cold Cases is an audioplay that consists of five episodes: four mythology episodes, and one monster of the week. The latter is a welcome return to a classic episode from season two, and it gave me a warm, fuzzy feeling, while also being pretty gross, and disturbing. It would have been right up there with some of the better monster of the week episodes, if it weren’t so short (about thirty minutes). But in this format, it works very well.

    The meat of this audioplay, however, is the mythology. And let me tell you right now that this mythology is so much better than the one we got in season ten. The X-Files has always had a very complex mytharc that, not only involved cool science, and juicy conspiracies, but also asked questions about family, spirituality, government control, and life beyond our Solar System. Most importantly, the mythology has always been driven by exciting stories, and strong well-developed characters.

    While I liked the mythology in season ten quite a bit (more than most other fans), I still felt that it was disconnected from the original mytharc, and that it was lacking something. Now, having listened to Cold Cases, I realise how poorly developed the season ten mytharc is.

    The reason the mythology in Cold Cases works is because it’s a continuation of the original mythology. Harris always takes us back to the original mythology by bringing back old characters – alive or dead – and making them relevant again. He takes the plot lines of the first nine seasons of the show, and he builds upon them. For instance, black oil plays a major part in this story, as well as Skyland Mountain – the iconic sight where Scully was abducted in season two.

    But it isn’t just a display of intertextuality, where the writer invokes our nostalgia and plays on our heart strings by showing us something that we know and love (I’m looking at you, J.J. Abrams). Harris brings back all the familiar iconography of the original show, and uses flashbacks to connect his own story to the original mythology but he does it to expand the established mytharc, and to challenge our beloved characters, and to push them in new directions. The story connects so much better with the first nine seasons than the season ten mytharc.

    Another thing that makes this story work is that it focuses solely on the original characters. There are a few supporting characters, like Assistant Director Morales, but they all serve a purpose, and their role in the story is limited to a bare minimum. Harris understands that The X-Files doesn’t need new, cool characters, especially if he won’t have the time to flesh them out to make them interesting.

    The story ends on a cliffhanger (because of course it does). But cliffhangers on The X-Files are never just a way to make the audience come back the next week, or the next season. Each time the credits roll just when Cancerman is about to say something menacing, or when the monster is about to reveal itself, we are reminded of the ambiguity and the uncertainty that plagues Scully and Mulder’s work. There are no definite answers; there is no closure, as each new ending is just a beginning of some bigger, more complex story. On the X-files, finding an answer to one question, always means creating more questions. And the ending of Cold Cases captures that ambiguity perfectly.

    Of course, not everything is perfect, and there are few goofs and inconsistencies scattered throughout the story. For instance, in one dramatic scene, Scully encounters a woman who starts speaking German. “I don’t speak German!” says Scully. While we know, from the season four episode, “Unruhe”, that Scully does, in fact, speak a little German.

    It’s also unclear as to how Scully and Mulder went from being pardoned by the FBI in I Want to Believe to once again hiding from the world, and going so far as to change their identities. Something big must have happened in that time period, and it sure would have been nice to know, what.

    As another reviewer on Goodreads said, if you’re new to The X-Files, this audiodrama is not the best introduction to this complex and confusing world. But if you’re familiar with the show and know your way around this universe, I can’t recommend this book enough.

    I’ve got to say, the creative team behind The X-Files is spoiling us. Now, I want more audioplays. A whole podcast with nothing but X-Files mysteries would be so cool.

    Plot: 4 stars
    Story: 5 stars
    Characters: 5 stars
    Performances: 5 stars

    Total: 5 stars
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