To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild Download (read online) free eBook .pdf.epub.kindle

To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918

World War I stands as one of history’s most senseless spasms of carnage, defying rational explanation. In a riveting, suspenseful narrative with haunting echoes for our own time, Adam Hochschild brings it to life as never before. He focuses on the long-ignored moral drama of the war’s critics, alongside its generals and heroes. Thrown in jail for their opposition to the wa

…more


The Book in English!


Download To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild free eBook pdf mobi epub mp3 fb2 CD txt doc kindle Ibook iOS:


To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild (0.00 USD)


Download To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild eBook Free:

MIRROR-2

To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild.pdf (USD-0.00)
To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild.epub (USD-0.00)
To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild.doc (USD-0.00)
To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild.txt (USD-0.00)
To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild.mobi (USD-0.00)


Join hundreds of thousands of satisfied members who previously spent countless hours searching for media and content online, now enjoying the hottestnew games, music, books, movies & software on our site.
It’s here and it’s free. Here’s why you should join:


  • Unlimited books, magazines and comics, wherever you go: directly in your browser on your computer or tablet.
  • More than 10 million titles spanning every genre imaginable, at your fingertips.
  • Get the best books, magazines and comics in all genres, including action, adventure, anime, manga, children and family, classic, , Horror, Music, Romance, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Sport and more.
  • New titles are added every day! We want to keep things new.
  • All platforms. Fully optimized
  • Find out why thousands of people go every day.Sign up and enjoy your entertainment, unlimited!


    TAGS:
    Online To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild eBook, Book To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild FB2, download To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild PDF , Download To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild MOBI, Online To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild eBook, free download To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild IPhone, Online ebook To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild PDF, Free To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild DJVU, Free download To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild TXT, Download To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild RTF, Online To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild FB2 , eBook To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild download TXT, Free To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild download eBook, Book To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild download MOBI, download To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild IPad, read To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild MOBI, Read online To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild DOC, Free To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild AWZ, Download eBook To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild iPad , Free To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild DJVU, Download To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild eBook free, Free download To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild DVD, Read online To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild TXT, Book To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild download DJVU, To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild download book free, To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild download book pdf free, To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild pdf book download free, Download eBook To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild pdf free, To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild download free epup, To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild ePub book download free, download eBook To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild, To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild download free pdf, To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild download eBooks free.

    L Fleisig

    May 17, 2011

    rated it
    it was amazing

    “When this century collapses, dead at last,
    And its sleep within the dark tomb has begun,
    Come, look down upon us, world, file past
    And be ashamed of what our age has done.

    Inscribe our stone, that everyone may see
    What this dead era valued most and best:
    Science, progress, work, technology
    And death – but death we prized above the rest.”

    These verses, written by early 20th-century Czech playwright and author Karel Capek, sounded a fitting leitmotif as I read Adam Hochschild’s “To End All Wars: A

    Inscribe our stone, that everyone may see
    What this dead era valued most and best:
    Science, progress, work, technology
    And death – but death we prized above the rest.”

    These verses, written by early 20th-century Czech playwright and author Karel Capek, sounded a fitting leitmotif as I read Adam Hochschild’s “To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918.” The 20th century was one ravaged by two world wars, genocide, and countless `smaller’ wars. But for sheer brutality, for the slaughter that turned hundreds of miles of trenches into a charnel house of unprecedented proportions it is hard to imagine a place or time when death was prized more than it was during the war to end all wars.

    Histories of World War I abound, from Barbara Tuchman (The Guns of August) to Winston Churchill (The World Crisis, 1911-1918) to John Keegan (The First World War). There are no shortage of books about the bravery of the soldiers who rose from their trenches and marched into certain death. Similarly there are no shortage of books about the almost criminally incompetent British and French Generals whose strategic planning (if you could call it that) was horrifically simple: send hundreds of thousands of men forward against entrenched positions and hope the Germans ran out of machine gun bullets before the British and French forces ran out of men. Not so readily available are books that take a look at the relatively few people who stood up and spoke out against the indiscriminate slaughter. Hochschild balances the scales a bit by taking a look at the stories and motivations behind those few souls who opposed it.

    The book is set up as a straightforward chronological narrative beginning with Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897 celebrating the 60 years of her monarchy, through the Boer War and the introduction of concentration camps and the use of machine guns as one of the original weapons of mass destruction, the lead up to war, and then a chronological narrative of the war itself. This is all well-plowed ground and if this were simply a narrative of the war it would be a well-written popular history that would serve as a good introduction to the period. However, Hochschild intersperses the traditional narrative with a parallel narrative that was not nearly so familiar to me. While focusing on Britain’s role in the war, Hochschild tells us the stories of people like Keir Hardie, Sylvia Pankhurst, Charlotte Despard (the brother of General John French, who was to become Commander in Chief of the British Expeditionary Forces), Emily Hobhouse, Bertrand Russell and others. These were people from all walks of life who for various reasons, political, social, or religious, opposed the war. Hochschild also looks at some of those who stridently supported the war from the sidelines, including Rudyard Kipling and the author John Buchan (The Thirty-Nine Steps (Dover Thrift Editions)) who lashed out at those who did not adopt the motto For King and Country.

    What Hochschild does very well in his book is to explore the family and social connections between the groups leading Britain into war and those few who opposed it. Causalities in World War I, as Hochschild points out hit the upper classes particularly hard. The officer class in the British military was almost exclusively drawn from the upper echelons of British society and their losses in the war were very high. One cliché about the American Civil War describes it as one in which brother fought against brother. Here we had upper class families rent asunder between those who fought (and often died) and those within their ranks who opposed it and sometimes went to prison for those beliefs.

    The Russian poet Nadezhda Mandelstam once wrote of the great deeds that can be accomplished by people who with great courage stand up and speak out on behalf of their conscience: that “a person with inner freedom, memory, and fear is that reed, that twig that changes the direction of a rushing river.” Hochschild does an excellent job writing about the twigs that desperately wanted to change the rushing river of blood that carried millions of people off to die. Their failure to achieve this goal, however, in no way diminishes their value and the value of this book.
    …more

    Warwick

    A book that brilliantly succeeds in finding a new way to talk about the First World War, by looking at the protesters and conscientious objectors who opposed it along the way. I must admit, in my head antiwar protests started sometime around the 60s with Vietnam; but it turns out that the British peace movement during 1914–18 is one of the most impressive in history.

    So riveting are many of the details here that you end up feeling amazed and annoyed that they aren’t included in more general histo

    So riveting are many of the details here that you end up feeling amazed and annoyed that they aren’t included in more general histories of the conflict. I’ve read countless thousands of words on John French over the last year, yet I somehow had no idea that the field marshal’s own sister was Charlotte Despard, one of the most intransigent, outspoken activists of the period. Despard denounced ‘the wicked war of this Capitalistic government’ while her brother was busy orchestrating it – and yet the two of them were as close as ever, regularly visiting each other and writing off their siblings’ political views as charming quirks.

    Despard also championed many other progressive causes of the time, notably women’s suffrage. The so-called suffragettes are a key part of the story, and a good illustration of how divided liberal activists were when the war broke out. Emmeline Pankhurst and her daughter Christabel went from planting bombs in Lloyd George’s house to working hand-in-hand with him from speaking-platforms and in editorials: ‘If you go to this war and give your life,’ Emmeline told a cheering crowd in Plymouth, ‘you could not end your life in a better way – for to give one’s life for one’s country, for a great cause, is a splendid thing.’ An argument that became impossible after Owen.

    Perhaps it helped cement the votes-for-women movement as being within the establishment – sure enough, women were enfranchised in 1918 before the war ended. Nevertheless as a modern reader all your sympathies are with the younger Pankhurst daughter, Sylvia, who remained absolutely committed to the antiwar movement and was more or less thrown out of her own family as a result. Sylvia’s secret lover – the pacifist independent MP Keir Hardie – is another key character in here, and one I’d previously known nothing about. Both of them were shunned, isolated, mocked.

    Hardie’s friend Bob Smillie, leader of the Scottish mineworkers, said his reply would be: ‘I tried to stop the bloody thing, my child.’

    Bertrand Russell also flits in and out of these pages, a towering moral presence. Every time I read about him I admire him more and more. Russell was jailed for six months for his antiwar activism (when the warder took down his details on arrival, he asked Russell’s religion, and he replied, ‘agnostic’. Asking how to spell it, the warder sighed, ‘Well, there are many religions, but I suppose they all worship the same God’). He still managed to keep in touch with two of his lovers while in prison, too – he wrote to a French actress in French, a language his jailers couldn’t understand, and sent letters to another woman smuggled out in copies of the Proceedings of the London Mathematics Society, which he told her was ‘more interesting than it appeared’.

    Hochschild does a brilliant job not just in uncovering the activities of these characters, some of whom have been comprehensively neglected, but also in tying their stories together: the narrative often reads like a novel with a large but interconnected cast. The whole thing is animated by a steady but unintrusive sense of injustice, and the writing is clear, notwithstanding a few foibles (he deploys, for instance, that odd American hypercorrection ‘felt badly’).

    What’s particularly sad, after following these people for so long, and hoping for some kind of victory on their behalf, is seeing how desperately almost all of them latched on to the Russian Revolution in 1917. It’s a harsh but enlightening test of moral character to see how quickly people could bring themselves to bail on the Soviet dream when things started going wrong – not a test many leftists passed with flying colours (but that’s a story better told elsewhere). And overall, this is a story of failure and disappointment, though the tone is moving and hopeful rather than depressing. The title points up the overarching irony. President Wilson had called the slaughter the ‘war to end all wars’ – but Sir Alfred Milner was more prescient in 1918 when, peering into the future as the bodies were cleared away, he described the Treaty of Versailles as ‘a Peace to end Peace’.

    …more

    William1

    May 23, 2011

    rated it
    really liked it

    Shelves:
    uk,
    21-ce,
    history,
    war,
    ww-i

    I think for many Americans this book will be something of a shocker. It tells the story of the British anti-war movement during World War I. First is the story of the enormous incompetence of those prosecuting the war; the highest ranking authority on the civil side was Prime Minister Asquith, and on the military side, the Generals French and Haig. This is a tale of enormous inhumanity, not just for the enemy, but for one’s own troops as well, who were ordered to make suicide attacks by the tens

    At the heart of the book, what makes it unique, are stories of the trials and tribulations of the British anti-war movement. Peopled in large part by well-meaning persons of a socialist bent, the movement was undermined and smeared by the British government who had all aspects of the national press completely under its thumb. Part of the anti-war story is about the Conscientious Objector (CO) community. I’m so glad Mr. Hochschild is getting this story out with this book, for their treatment by members of the British police authorities, who shamelessly violated their civil rights, was horrendous. Early on the COs were sent to the front anyway, where the plan was to shoot them when they refused to obey orders. Fortunately, political advocates at home prevented this from happening. They were then moved to a filthy prison in Boulogne where the rats ran over them at night, and the food was disgusting. But even this, I suppose, was better than sitting at the front listening to the big guns thunder and wondering if you’d live to see your loved ones.

    Another thing Hochschild does well here is to tell the tale of the Russian Revolution and the subsequent collapse of the Czarist state in 1917 in context with how the Brits were trying to win the war. This is fascinating.
    …more