Unemployable! by David Thomas Roberts Download (read online) free eBook .pdf.epub.kindle

Unemployable!

Roberts makes the case that this may be the greatest time in history to start a business! Using Roberts’ strategies and principles in this book, learn how to become ”UNEMPLOYABLE!” your entire life! Most of us are taught to get a good education and a good job. The idea that we should be content to have someone else dictate our daily commute, our income, schedules and vac

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    Wally Wood

    Mar 17, 2016

    rated it
    liked it

    Although the subtitle to David Thomas Roberts’ Unemployable! is “How to be Successfully Unemployed Your Entire Life,” it is less a how-to guide than a sermon. Roberts is preaching to the dissatisfied and the hopeful. “Now is the greatest time in history to start a business,” he proclaims. And his implied message continues, if you are unhappy in your job you can do what I’ve done and end up in the top 1/10th of 1 percent of incomes in America. Ah, if it were only so.

    I am writing as a SCORE couns

    I am writing as a SCORE counselor (a free national business counseling resource Roberts does not mention), and as such meet with aspiring entrepreneurs regularly to help them realize their ambitions. Many of them would agree with Roberts: “Success for me is the freedom to do the things I love without others controlling my time, income or schedule, and without worrying about money.” Who wouldn’t? Unfortunately, this book is more inspirational than useful, superficial rather than instructive.

    Not that there is anything wrong with Roberts’ advice. His chapter “Are You Financially Illiterate?” is astute and worth embracing. “Most Americans,” he claims, “live above their means, financing their lifestyle with debt. The vast majority don’t have an income problem; they have spending problem.” He is sensitive to this issue because “I’ve gone broke—twice.” When revenue dropped in his first enterprise, an air freight business, the firm could not survive. He immediately started another company and I would like to know more about both the failure and the process behind the second startup.

    The chapter “Do I really Need a Business Plan?” is also right on. Roberts’ first sentence: “The simple answer is ‘yes.'” SCORE counselors spend an inordinate amount of time guiding our clients through the creation of a business plan. I can only concur with the “Lessons Learned” (a feature at the end of each chapter): “A business plan helps you organize your thoughts and plans for your business. Every business should have a business play. Your business plan will likely morph over time with changing business conditions, unforeseen events and new opportunities. A formal business plan with pro forma financials is always necessary if you are borrowing money or taking investment from others into your business equity . . .”

    One last example, from Roberts’ rules of business: “. . . the very nanosecond you realize you have made a bad hire, end it. Nothing is more disruptive and destructive to a company than a bad hire, with the possible exception of the divorce of the owners.” No question.

    So the advice is solid. My criticism is that there’s not enough meat on these bones. At the end of a course I teach on how to start a business, I provide students with a long list of additional sources. In addition to the “Lessons Learned,” Roberts does provide a useful glossary—”accounts payable aging,” “accounts receivable financing,” “amortization,” etc.—but no citations for further information. I am always looking for works I can suggest to prospective entrepreneurs; read Unemployable! for encouragement, embrace the nuggets of good advice, but you’re going to need more than this to be successfully unemployed.
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    Melissa Danielle

    Oct 16, 2017

    rated it
    did not like it

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    I wanted to like this book for inviting the reader to question their current employment situation and consider if the way they traded time for money was really paying off for them in the long term, and for highlighting some of the financial burdens we take on (student loans and mortgages) that keep us trapped in jobs with limited growth and opportunities for financial freedom. There are some really good nuggets here, but they’re lo

    I wanted to like this book for inviting the reader to question their current employment situation and consider if the way they traded time for money was really paying off for them in the long term, and for highlighting some of the financial burdens we take on (student loans and mortgages) that keep us trapped in jobs with limited growth and opportunities for financial freedom. There are some really good nuggets here, but they’re lost in the author’s own confusion and ego as he attempts to define personal freedom through entrepreneurship.

    Of course, personal freedom looks different for everyone, and I’ve come to understand it as being able to make money in a way that doesn’t require your constant presence. If you can wake up and make a decision about your day that doesn’t involve doing something to make money and you’ll still get paid, that’s true personal freedom. Roberts defines it as the freedom to do the things he loves without others controlling his time, income, or schedule, and without worrying about money.

    Throughout the book, Roberts shares his feelings about his stepfather’s choice to stay employed in a position that ultimately did not value his commitment to the company. He didn’t understand why his stepfather would not take the risk of turning down promotions, even when they did not benefit him financially. He didn’t understand why his stepfather was unwilling to step out on his own. Hmmm, maybe because he had a wife and five kids to take care of?!

    He acknowledges that entrepreneurship is not for everyone but doesn’t extend this compassion to the man that raised and provided for him.

    There are pros and cons to every type of income-producing model, whether you work for yourself or someone else, and every iteration in between.

    Roberts talks about the gig economy as having unlimited potential and personal freedom. Unless you’re in an industry where you can charge a lot of money for minimal output, you’ll be juggling a lot of short-term contracts and assignments that could very well look like the full-time job Roberts eschews, minus the benefits and free donuts in the breakroom. If you’re looking at the gig economy model and you’re thinking of Lyft, Airbnb, and TaskRabbit, you don’t understand how these models work and who’s actually benefiting from them in the long-term. The person using their car to give strangers rides, subletting their apartment short-term to help cover their rent, or assembling someone else’s Ikea furniture may be keeping their heads above water, but they are not enjoying the financial success and freedom at the level of the founders of these companies.

    While they may be in control of how they use their time to make money, this does not meet Roberts’ definition of personal freedom.

    As someone who’s been reimagining and redefining the nature of work in my own life, I oscillate between the lure of the financial security that is the scheduled paycheck of a traditional 9-5 and the desire to wake up without an alarm clock, among other less than thrilling aspects of working for someone else. Success for me includes having a life I don’t need a vacation or a retirement from, paying off these student loans, and being in control of my time without having to worry about money.

    Since Roberts and I seem to be on the same page, I’m confused as to why he’d offer up the gig economy as a type of micro business with a high potential for success and personal freedom and then go on to talk about other business models, such as sales and owning a franchise as being comparable paths to said freedom. Commission sales models are not for anyone looking to overcome underearning, and the more lucrative a franchise, the higher your net worth has to be for you to be able to buy-in. Roberts advises college students to not take on student loans to pay for their education and for aspiring homebuyers to not take out a mortgage for more than 15 years, so why would he recommend a business model that has a variable payout structure based on your performance (sales) and one that could cost you 25,000 to several hundred thousands of dollars (franchise)? Where is the money to float you going to come from?

    In between these chapters, he goes on about how he was able to become a successful business owner several times over in industries he didn’t necessarily have a passion for but recognized the high financial return. All of this beginning at the ripe young age of 21. He talks about the shortcomings of MBA programs in that they’re only able to produce employees and not entrepreneurs, but there’s no reflection on how different business looked when he was 21 as compared to what it looks like for today’s 21 year olds who want to skip college and jump into into the sea of self-employment.

    Network marketing also makes a curious appearance. Early in the book, he talks about how most people don’t know what it actually costs them financially in their jobs, when you figure in commute times and other factors cutting into your free time and earning potential. OK, that’s true. But networking marketing, in which your earning potential is determined by both your ability to successfully sell a product and get other people to sell that product for you,  also costs money and time, as well as a few friends and family, when you factor in the initial investment and time you have to spend putting yourself out there and signing people on to your downline.

    And then there’s some questionable phrasing and statements, such as mentioning that his stepfather’s job was “given to a minority with an MBA at half his salary” after the company merged, leaving him to “retire into oblivion”, and “if you send a kid to a typical American University today, you will likely get back a little communist…he or she will have leftist propaganda drilled into their impressionable young minds for four or more years.”

    Umm…

    Clearly, I am not his target audience.

    Aside from that, I really can’t tell who this book is for or what it’s intended purpose is.

    When I’m being honest, my multi-passionate, generalist life makes me unemployable. I’ve spent a sizeable amount of interviewing explainng why much of my current work-life is short-term and seasonal (I used to work with farmers) and exactly how is it that I can do all the things I know how to (when you work in non-profits or in under-resourced environments, you don’t have a choice but to figure it out). But mostly, I have to deal with the the prospective employer’s fears that I’m overqualified and will want more money than they’re willing to pay, or that I’ll get bored and leave in less than a year. That is a truer definition of what it means to be unemployable.  For a better definition with real-world examples, visit unemployable.com.

    Being unemployable is not about shuffling between several low-paying gigs, not becoming a network marketer or sales entrepreneur, and definitely not becoming a franchise owner.

    It’s not clear how long it took for him to grow his business to the level where he doesn’t have to be in it as often as he did when he first started, and I wish he’d been a bit more forthcoming and honest about that. He mentioned not taking a salary in his early years and that’s not something a lot of people are in a position to do. The path to entrepreneurial success can be a long and challenging road for some. You may be required to put in long hours and miss out on important family time for several years before you find success. It’s a lot of responsibility and risk that makes most people fine to simply show up and collect a check.

    But to call the entrepreneurial life an unemployable one in this context shows that it doesn’t mean what Roberts thinks it means.
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    Charles

    Mar 08, 2016

    rated it
    it was amazing

    While the title makes it sound like the book is a blueprint for how to freeload throughout life, the content and purposes are far different. Roberts’ goal is to demonstrate how it is possible to create and manage your own business rather than spend your life as a functional cog in an employment machine. The one clear and important point of the book that all people should understand is that there is NO such thing as a secure and stable job. The business world is changing at a very rapid speed an

    This book was made available for free for review purposes.

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